Commands using manpath (1)

  • If I type 'man something', I want it to find the manpage in the same order as my PATH. You can add something like this to your .bashrc # # Add my MacPorts, my personal utilities and my company utilities to my PATH. export PATH=$PATH:/opt/local/bin:$HOME/bin:/our_company_utils/bin/ # Now set the manpath based on the PATH, after man(1) parses man.conf # - No need to modify man.conf or manually modify MANPATH_MAP # - Works on Linux, FreeBSD & Darwin, unlike /etc/manpaths.d/ # Must unset MANPATH first. MANPATH is set on some systems automatically (Mac), # which causes manpath to ignore the values of PATH like /opt/local/bin (MacPorts). # Also MANPATH may be deprecated. See "SEARCH PATH FOR MANUAL PAGES" in man(1) unset MANPATH # manpath acts differently on Solaris, FreeBSD, MacOSX & GNU. This works everywhere. manpath >/dev/null # Note that MacOSX, FreeBSD & Linux have fancier ways to do some of this. (e.g. 'man --path' or 'man -q'), but this command is more universal and should work everywhere. Show Sample Output


    0
    unset MANPATH; manpath >/dev/null
    StefanLasiewski · 2010-07-02 19:45:27 0

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