Commands tagged dns (36)

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easily trace all Nginx processes
Nginx (and other webservers like Apache) can be awkward to trace. They run as root, then switch to another user once they're ready to serve web pages. They also have a "master" process and multiple worker processes. The given command finds the process IDs of all Nginx processes, joins them together with a comma, then traces all of them at once with "sudo strace." System trace output can be overwhelming, so we only capture "networking" output. TIP: to kill this complex strace, do "sudo killall strace". Compare with a similar command: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/11918/easily-strace-all-your-apache-processes

list files recursively by size

easily strace all your apache *child* processes
Like the original version except it does not include the parent apache process or the grep process and adds "sudo" so it can be run by user.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Clean your broken terminal
When some console full-screen program (minicom, vi, some installers) breaks down your terminal, try this command to revert all options to "sane" settings (sane is a built-in combo of a lot of stty options)

Show max lengths of all fields in a pipe delimited file with header row

Cut the first 'N' characters of a line
Saves one character, the original is probably clearer

Edit a script that's somewhere in your path.
Often I need to edit a bash or perl script I've written. I know it's in my path but I don't feel like typing the whole path (or I don't remember the path).

Keep track of diff progress
You're running a program that reads LOTS of files and takes a long time. But it doesn't tell you about its progress. First, run a command in the background, e.g. $ find /usr/share/doc -type f -exec cat {} + > output_file.txt Then run the watch command. "watch -d" highlights the changes as they happen In bash: $! is the process id (pid) of the last command run in the background. You can change this to $(pidof my_command) to watch something in particular.

Get your public ip


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