Commands tagged dns (38)

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Function that outputs dots every second until command completes
Very useful in shell scripts because you can run a task nicely in the background using job-control and output progress until it completes. Here's an example of how I use it in backup scripts to run gpg in the background to encrypt an archive file (which I create in this same way). $! is the process ID of the last run command, which is saved here as the variable PI, then sleeper is called with the process id of the gpg task (PI), and sleeper is also specified to output : instead of the default . every 3 seconds instead of the default 1. So a shorter version would be sleeper $!; The wait is also used here, though it may not be needed on your system. $ echo ">>> ENCRYPTING SQL BACKUP" $ gpg --output archive.tgz.asc --encrypt archive.tgz 1>/dev/null & $ PI=$!; sleeper $PI ":" 3; wait $PI && rm archive.tgz &>/dev/null Previously to get around the $! not always being available, I would instead check for the existance of the process ID by checking if the directory /proc/$PID existed, but not everyone uses proc anymore. That version is currently the one at http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html but I plan on upgrading to this new version soon.

find duplicate processes
This command will allow to search for duplicate processes and sort them by their run count. Note that if there are same processes run by different users you'll see only one user in the result line, so you'll need to do: $ ps aux | grep to see all users that run this command.

Ctrl+S Ctrl+Q terminal output lock and unlock
These are simple shortcuts to pause and continue terminal output, works in most terminals and screen multiplexers like screen. You can use it to catch something if things change too fast, and scroll with Shift + PgUp PgDown. On linux console ScrollLock can also be used.

Rename files to be all in CAPITALS
Simple bash/ksh/sh command to rename all files from lower to upper case. If you want to do other stuff you can change the tr command to a sed or awk... and/or change mv to cp....

check open ports without netstat or lsof

check open ports without netstat or lsof

see the TIME_WAIT and ESTABLISHED nums of the network
see the TIME_WAIT and ESTABLISHED nums of the network

Rescan partitions on a SCSI device
Used this after cloning a disk with dd to make the newly written partitions show up in /dev/

Get Your IP Geographic Location with curl and jq

Merge PDFs with Ghostscript wrapped in a function
This is an expansion on a previous entry, which I've wrapped in a function and placed in my profile. The "[email protected]" is a positional parameter, much like "$*", but the parameters are passed on intact, without interpretation or expansion; so you can simply call the function like this: mergepdf * This will output a merged PDF of all PDFs in the current directory. Alternatively, you can simply list them like so: mergepdf 00.pdf 01.pdf 02.pdf ... N.B. Passing a wildcard will merge all PDFs in the current directory in name order, e.g. 00.pdf 01.pdf aa.pdf ab.pdf


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