Commands by netsaint (2)

  • Create a text file called domainlist.txt with a domain per line, then run the command above. All registries are a little different, so play around with the command. Should produce a list of domains and their expirations date. I am responsible for my companies domains and have a dozen or so myself, so this is a quick check if I overlooked any.


    3
    cat domainlist.txt | while read line; do echo -ne $line; whois $line | grep Expiration ; done | sed 's:Expiration Date::'
    netsaint · 2010-05-02 06:49:09 1
  • This command uses nmap to perform reverse DNS lookups on a subnet. It produces a list of IP addresses with the corresponding PTR record for a given subnet. You can enter the subnet in CDIR notation (i.e. /24 for a Class C)). You could add "--dns-servers x.x.x.x" after the "-sL" if you need the lookups to be performed on a specific DNS server. On some installations nmap needs sudo I believe. Also I hope awk is standard on most distros. Show Sample Output


    4
    nmap -R -sL 209.85.229.99/27 | awk '{if($3=="not")print"("$2") no PTR";else print$3" is "$2}' | grep '('
    netsaint · 2009-09-02 16:33:15 1

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