Commands tagged wikipedia (6)

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Export a subset of a database
Limits the number of rows per table to X

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Randomize lines (opposite of | sort)
Randomizes a file. The opposite of sort is sort -R!

split a string (2)

Use vi commands to edit your command lines
If you spend all day editing in vi then switching your fingers to Emacs mode just for the command line can be difficult. Use set -o vi in your bash shell and enjoy the power of a real editor.

Limit the cpu usage of a process
This will limit the average amount of CPU it consumes.

Compare a remote file with a local file

search office documents for credit card numbers and social security number SSN docx xlsx
# CC with SSN dash ( low false positive only match ###-##-#### not any 8digi number ) $ find . -iname "*.???x" -type f -exec unzip -p '{}' '*' \; | sed -e 's/]\{1,\}>/ /g; s/[^[:print:]]\{1,\}/ /g' | egrep "\b4[0-9]{12}(?:[0-9]{3})?\b|\b5[1-5][0-9]{14}\b|\b6011[0-9]{14}\b|\b3(?:0[0-5]\b|\b[68][0-9])[0-9]{11}\b|\b3[47][0-9]{13}\b|\b[0-9]{3}-[0-9]{2}-[0-9]{4}\b" $ rmccurdyDOTcom

Output Windows services in a neatly formated list (cygwin)
Outputs Windows Services service name and display name using "sc query", pipes the output to "awk" for processing, then "column" for formatting. List All Services: $ sc query state= all | awk '/SERVICE_NAME/{printf"%s:",$2;getline;gsub(/DISP.*:\ /,"");printf"%s\n",$0}' | column -ts\: List Started Services: $sc query | awk '/SERVICE_NAME/{printf"%s:",$2;getline;gsub(/DISP.*:\ /,"");printf"%s\n",$0}' | column -ts\: List Stopped Services: $sc query state= inactive| awk '/SERVICE_NAME/{printf"%s:",$2;getline;gsub(/DISP.*:\ /,"");printf"%s\n",$0}' | column -ts\:

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.


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