Commands by oshazard (6)

  • Credit goes to "eightmillion" Show Sample Output


    -5
    removedir(){ read -p "Delete the current directory $PWD ? " human;if [ "$human" = "yes" ]; then [ -z "${PWD##*/}" ] && { echo "$PWD not set" >&2;return 1;}; rm -Rf ../"${PWD##*/}"/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; }
    oshazard · 2010-01-20 08:01:21 3
  • CHANGELOG Version 1.1 removedir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=$(echo "$PWD" | sed 's/ /\\ /g'); foo=$(basename "$blah"); rm -Rf ../$foo/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; } BUG FIX: Folders with spaces Version 1.0 removedir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=`basename $PWD`; rm -Rf ../$blah/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; } BUG FIX: Hidden directories (.dotdirectory) Version 0.9 rmdir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD. Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=`basename $PWD`; rm -Rf ../$blah/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; } Removes current directory with recursive and force flags plus basic human check. When prompted type yes 1. [[email protected] ~]$ ls foo bar 2. [[email protected] ~]$ cd foo 3. [[email protected] foo]$ removedir 4. yes 5. rm -Rf foo/ 6. [[email protected] ~]$ 7. [[email protected] ~]$ ls bar Show Sample Output


    -2
    removedir () { echo "Deleting the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=$(echo "$PWD" | sed 's/ /\\ /g'); foo=$(basename "$blah"); rm -Rf ../$foo/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; }
    oshazard · 2010-01-17 11:34:38 3
  • Combines a few repetitive tasks when compiling source code. Especially useful when a hypen in a file-name breaks tab completion. 1.) wget source.tar.gz 2.) tar xzvf source.tar.gz 3.) cd source 4.) ls From there you can run ./configure, make and etc. Show Sample Output


    -1
    wtzc () { wget "[email protected]"; foo=`echo "[email protected]" | sed 's:.*/::'`; tar xzvf $foo; blah=`echo $foo | sed 's:,*/::'`; bar=`echo $blah | sed -e 's/\(.*\)\..*/\1/' -e 's/\(.*\)\..*/\1/'`; cd $bar; ls; }
    oshazard · 2010-01-17 11:25:47 0

  • 6
    mwiki () { blah=`echo [email protected] | sed -e 's/ /_/g'`; dig +short txt $blah.wp.dg.cx; }
    oshazard · 2010-01-16 07:13:43 0
  • awk extract every nth line. Generic is: awk '{if (NR % LINE == POSITION) print $0}' foo where "last" position is always 0 (zero). Show Sample Output


    -1
    awk '{if (NR % 3 == 1) print $0}' foo > foo_every3_position1; awk '{if (NR % 3 == 2) print $0}' foo > foo_every3_position2; awk '{if (NR % 3 == 0) print $0}' foo > foo_every3_position3
    oshazard · 2010-01-08 04:20:06 1
  • sed extract every nth line. Generic is: sed -n 'STARTPOSITION,${p;n;*LINE}' foo where n;*LINE = how many lines. thus p;n;n; is "for every 3 lines" and p;n;n;n;n; is "for every 5 lines" Show Sample Output


    1
    sed -n '1,${p;n;n;}' foo > foo_every3_position1; sed -n '2,${p;n;n;}' foo > foo_every3_position2; sed -n '3,${p;n;n;}' foo > foo_every3_position3
    oshazard · 2010-01-08 04:19:59 1

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

pdfcount: get number of pages in a PDF file

Get IPv4 of eth0 for use with scripts
Simple and easy. No regex, no search and replace. Just clean, built-in tools.

Edit all files found having a specific string found by grep
The grep switches eliminate the need for awk and sed. Modifying vim with -p will show all files in separate tabs, -o in separate vim windows. Just wish it didn't hose my terminal once I exit vim!!

access to last touched or created file with arrow_up_key immediately after displaying the file list
Display recursive file list (newest file displayed at the end) and be free to access last file in the list simply by pressing arrow_up_key i.e. open it with joe editor. BTW IMHO the list of files with newest files at the end is often more informative. Put this 'lsa' function somewhere in your .bashrc and issue $ . ~/.bashrc or $ source ~/.bashrc to have access to the 'lsa' command immediately. . (the function appends command "joe last_file_in_the_list" at the end of command history)

Deal with dot files safely

Copy without overwriting

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Swap a file or dir with quick resotre
This lets you replace a file or directory and quickly revert if something goes wrong. For example, the current version of a website's files are in public_html. Put a new version of the site in public_html~ and execute the command. The names are swapped. If anything goes wrong, execute it again (up arrow or !!).

Add your public SSH key to a server in one command
Just run the command, type your password, and that's the last time you need to enter your password for that server. This assumes that the server supports publickey authentication. Also, the permissions on your home dir are 755, and the permissions on your .ssh dir are 700 (local and remote).

Search and play youtube videos directly to terminal (no X needed)
pyt 'Stairway to heaven - Led Zeppelin' pyt 'brain damage - Pink Floyd' No web browser or even X needed. Just a cli and internet connection! mplayer is pauseable and can skip ahead This may break if youtube changes their search html.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: