Commands by oshazard (6)

  • Credit goes to "eightmillion" Show Sample Output


    -5
    removedir(){ read -p "Delete the current directory $PWD ? " human;if [ "$human" = "yes" ]; then [ -z "${PWD##*/}" ] && { echo "$PWD not set" >&2;return 1;}; rm -Rf ../"${PWD##*/}"/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; }
    oshazard · 2010-01-20 08:01:21 3
  • CHANGELOG Version 1.1 removedir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=$(echo "$PWD" | sed 's/ /\\ /g'); foo=$(basename "$blah"); rm -Rf ../$foo/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; } BUG FIX: Folders with spaces Version 1.0 removedir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=`basename $PWD`; rm -Rf ../$blah/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; } BUG FIX: Hidden directories (.dotdirectory) Version 0.9 rmdir () { echo "You are about to delete the current directory $PWD. Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=`basename $PWD`; rm -Rf ../$blah/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; } Removes current directory with recursive and force flags plus basic human check. When prompted type yes 1. [[email protected] ~]$ ls foo bar 2. [[email protected] ~]$ cd foo 3. [[email protected] foo]$ removedir 4. yes 5. rm -Rf foo/ 6. [[email protected] ~]$ 7. [[email protected] ~]$ ls bar Show Sample Output


    -2
    removedir () { echo "Deleting the current directory $PWD Are you sure?"; read human; if [[ "$human" = "yes" ]]; then blah=$(echo "$PWD" | sed 's/ /\\ /g'); foo=$(basename "$blah"); rm -Rf ../$foo/ && cd ..; else echo "I'm watching you" | pv -qL 10; fi; }
    oshazard · 2010-01-17 11:34:38 3
  • Combines a few repetitive tasks when compiling source code. Especially useful when a hypen in a file-name breaks tab completion. 1.) wget source.tar.gz 2.) tar xzvf source.tar.gz 3.) cd source 4.) ls From there you can run ./configure, make and etc. Show Sample Output


    -1
    wtzc () { wget "[email protected]"; foo=`echo "[email protected]" | sed 's:.*/::'`; tar xzvf $foo; blah=`echo $foo | sed 's:,*/::'`; bar=`echo $blah | sed -e 's/\(.*\)\..*/\1/' -e 's/\(.*\)\..*/\1/'`; cd $bar; ls; }
    oshazard · 2010-01-17 11:25:47 0

  • 6
    mwiki () { blah=`echo [email protected] | sed -e 's/ /_/g'`; dig +short txt $blah.wp.dg.cx; }
    oshazard · 2010-01-16 07:13:43 0
  • awk extract every nth line. Generic is: awk '{if (NR % LINE == POSITION) print $0}' foo where "last" position is always 0 (zero). Show Sample Output


    -1
    awk '{if (NR % 3 == 1) print $0}' foo > foo_every3_position1; awk '{if (NR % 3 == 2) print $0}' foo > foo_every3_position2; awk '{if (NR % 3 == 0) print $0}' foo > foo_every3_position3
    oshazard · 2010-01-08 04:20:06 0
  • sed extract every nth line. Generic is: sed -n 'STARTPOSITION,${p;n;*LINE}' foo where n;*LINE = how many lines. thus p;n;n; is "for every 3 lines" and p;n;n;n;n; is "for every 5 lines" Show Sample Output


    1
    sed -n '1,${p;n;n;}' foo > foo_every3_position1; sed -n '2,${p;n;n;}' foo > foo_every3_position2; sed -n '3,${p;n;n;}' foo > foo_every3_position3
    oshazard · 2010-01-08 04:19:59 0

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