Commands using gzip (58)

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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

List upcoming events on google calendar
Requires googlecl (http://code.google.com/p/googlecl/) Even better when you wrap this in a script and allow the --date=STRING to be $1. Then you can type: whatson "next Thursday" The date string for UNIX date is very flexible. You can also add --cal "[regex]" to the end for multiple calendars.

convert (almost) any image into a video
This is an extract from a larger script which makes up slideshow videos from images. $seconds is the number of seconds the video will last, and $num is a loop counter which numbers the videos for concat into a longer video later, so they will be in order. The dev/null bit on the end cuts ffmpeg's verbosity.

fetch all revisions of a specific file in an SVN repository
Manages everything through one sed script instead of pipes of greps and awks. Quoting of shell variables is generally easier within a sed script.

Synchronize both your system clock and hardware clock and calculate/adjust time drift
Do not run this command if you already have ntpd running! This needs to run as root, for example with sudo: $ sudo ntpdate pool.ntp.org && sudo hwclock --systohc && sudo hwclock --adjust This command will fetch accurate time from NTP servers and synchronize your system clock, then it will use the system clock to synchronize your hardware clock, and will calculate the time drift.

Sort and count subjects of emails stuck in Exim queue

List docker volumes by container

E-mail a traditional Berkeley mbox to another recipient as individual e-mails.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

mirrors directory to a ftp server
http://lftp.yar.ru/


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