Commands tagged tar (84)


  • 40
    tar -tf <file.tar.gz> | xargs rm -r
    prayer · 2009-07-06 22:23:11 3
  • What happens here is we tell tar to create "-c" an archive of all files in current dir "." (recursively) and output the data to stdout "-f -". Next we specify the size "-s" to pv of all files in current dir. The "du -sb . | awk ?{print $1}?" returns number of bytes in current dir, and it gets fed as "-s" parameter to pv. Next we gzip the whole content and output the result to out.tgz file. This way "pv" knows how much data is still left to be processed and shows us that it will take yet another 4 mins 49 secs to finish. Credit: Peteris Krumins http://www.catonmat.net/blog/unix-utilities-pipe-viewer/ Show Sample Output


    26
    tar -cf - . | pv -s $(du -sb . | awk '{print $1}') | gzip > out.tgz
    opertinicy · 2009-12-18 17:09:08 3
  • Create an AES256 encrypted and compressed tar archive. User is prompted to enter the password. Decrypt with: openssl enc -d -aes256 -in <file> | tar --extract --file - --gzip


    25
    tar --create --file - --posix --gzip -- <dir> | openssl enc -e -aes256 -out <file>
    seb1245 · 2012-11-27 15:33:45 1
  • This improves on #9892 by compressing the directory on the remote machine so that the amount of data transferred over the network is much smaller. The command uses ssh(1) to get to a remote host, uses tar(1) to archive and compress a remote directory, prints the result to STDOUT, which is written to a local file. In other words, we are archiving and compressing a remote directory to our local box.


    20
    ssh [email protected] "tar -zcf - /path/to/dir" > dir.tar.gz
    __ · 2011-12-16 05:48:38 2
  • Create a tar file in multiple parts if it's to large for a single disk, your filesystem, etc. Rejoin later with `cat .tar.*|tar xf -` Show Sample Output


    17
    tar cf - <dir>|split -b<max_size>M - <name>.tar.
    dinomite · 2009-11-11 01:53:33 0
  • Execute it from the source host, where the source files you wish backup resides. With the minus '-' the tar command deliver the compressed output to the standar output and, trough over the ssh session to the remote host. On the other hand the backup host will be receive the stream and read it from the standar input sending it to the /path/to/backup/backupfile.tar.bz2 Show Sample Output


    13
    tar jcpf - [sourceDirs] |ssh [email protected] "cat > /path/to/backup/backupfile.tar.bz2"
    mack · 2010-03-24 01:29:25 0
  • This command will copy a folder tree (keeping the parent folders) through ssh. It will: - compress the data - stream the compressed data through ssh - decompress the data on the local folder This command will take no additional space on the host machine (no need to create compressed tar files, transfer it and then delete it on the host). There is some situations (like mirroring a remote machine) where you simply cant wait for a huge time taking scp command or cant compress the data to a tarball on the host because of file system space limitation, so this command can do the job quite well. This command performs very well mainly when a lot of data is involved in the process. If you copying a low amount of data, use scp instead (easier to type) Show Sample Output


    12
    ssh <host> 'tar -cz /<folder>/<subfolder>' | tar -xvz
    polaco · 2009-11-10 20:06:47 4
  • If archive has leading directory level same as archive name and you want to strip it, this command is for you.


    12
    tar -xaf archive.tar.gz --strip-components=1
    sirex · 2011-11-29 07:38:19 0
  • This Anti-TarBomb function makes it easy to unpack a .tar.gz without worrying about the possibility that it will "explode" in your current directory. I've usually always created a temporary folder in which I extracted the tarball first, but I got tired of having to reorganize the files afterwards. Just add this function to your .zshrc / .bashrc and use it like this; atb arch1.tar.gz and it will create a folder for the extracted files, if they aren't already in a single folder. This only works for .tar.gz, but it's very easy to edit the function to suit your needs, if you want to extract .tgz, .tar.bz2 or just .tar. More info about tarbombs at http://www.linfo.org/tarbomb.html Tested in zsh and bash. UPDATE: This function works for .tar.gz, .tar.bz2, .tgz, .tbz and .tar in zsh (not working in bash): atb() { l=$(tar tf $1); if [ $(echo "$l" | wc -l) -eq $(echo "$l" | grep $(echo "$l" | head -n1) | wc -l) ]; then tar xf $1; else mkdir ${1%.t(ar.gz||ar.bz2||gz||bz||ar)} && tar xf $1 -C ${1%.t(ar.gz||ar.bz2||gz||bz||ar)}; fi ;} UPDATE2: From the comments; bepaald came with a variant that works for .tar.gz, .tar.bz2, .tgz, .tbz and .tar in bash: atb() {shopt -s extglob ; l=$(tar tf $1); if [ $(echo "$l" | wc -l) -eq $(echo "$l" | grep $(echo "$l" | head -n1) | wc -l) ]; then tar xf $1; else mkdir ${1%[email protected](ar.gz|ar.bz2|gz|bz|ar)} && tar xf $1 -C ${1%[email protected](ar.gz|ar.bz2|gz|bz|ar)}; fi ; shopt -u extglob} Show Sample Output


    10
    atb() { l=$(tar tf $1); if [ $(echo "$l" | wc -l) -eq $(echo "$l" | grep $(echo "$l" | head -n1) | wc -l) ]; then tar xf $1; else mkdir ${1%.tar.gz} && tar xf $1 -C ${1%.tar.gz}; fi ;}
    elfreak · 2010-10-16 05:50:32 5
  • It bypasses encryption overhead of SSH and depending on configuration can be significantly faster. It's recommended to use only in trusted networks.


    9
    On target: "nc -l 4000 | tar xvf -" On source: "tar -cf - . | nc target_ip 4000"
    tiagofischer · 2009-06-30 19:36:19 3
  • Using 7z to create archives is OK, but when you use tar, you preserve all file-specific information such as ownership, perms, etc. If that's important to you, this is a better way to do it.


    8
    tar cf - /path/to/data | 7z a -si archivename.tar.7z
    slashdot · 2009-07-14 14:21:30 2
  • Here how to recover the remote backup over ssh Show Sample Output


    8
    ssh [email protected] "cat /path/to/backup/backupfile.tar.bz2" |tar jpxf -
    mack · 2010-03-24 01:35:28 2
  • This is freaking sweet!!! Here is the full alias, (I didn't want to cause display problems on commandlinefu.com's homepage): alias tarred='( ( D=`builtin pwd`; F=$(date +$HOME/`sed "s,[/ ],#,g" <<< ${D/${HOME}/}`#-%F.tgz); S=$SECONDS; tar --ignore-failed-read --transform "s,^${D%/*},`date +${D%/*}.%F`,S" -czPf "$"F "$D" && logger -s "Tarred $D to $F in $(($SECONDS-$S)) seconds" ) & )' Creates a .tgz archive of whatever directory it is run from, in the background, detached from current shell so if you logout it will still complete. Also, you can run this as many times as you want, if the archive .tgz already exists, it just moves it to a numbered backup '--backup=numbered'. The coolest part of this is the transformation performed by tar and sed so that the archive file names are automatically created, and when you extract the archive file it is completely safe thanks to the transform command. If you archive lets say /home/tombdigger/new-stuff-to-backup/ it will create the archive /home/#home#tombdigger#new-stuff-to-backup#-2010-11-18.tgz Then when you extract it, like tar -xvzf #home#tombdigger#new-stuff-to-backup#-2010-11-18.tgz instead of overwriting an existing /home/tombdigger/new-stuff-to-backup/ directory, it will extract to /home/tombdigger/new-stuff-to-backup.2010-11-18/ Basically, the tar archive filename is the PWD with all '/' replaced with '#', and the date is appended to the name so that multiple archives are easily managed. This example saves all archives to your $HOME/archive-name.tgz, but I have a $BKDIR variable with my backup location for each shell user, so I just replaced HOME with BKDIR in the alias. So when I ran this in /opt/askapache/SOURCE/lockfile-progs-0.1.11/ the archive was created at /askapache-bk/#opt#askapache#SOURCE#lockfile-progs-0.1.11#-2010-11-18.tgz Upon completion, uses the universal logger tool to output its completion to syslog and stderr (printed to your terminal), just remove that part if you don't want it, or just remove the '-s ' option from logger to keep the logs only in syslog and not on your terminal. Here's how my syslog server recorded this.. 2010-11-18T00:44:13-05:00 gravedigger.askapache.com (127.0.0.5) [user] [notice] (logger:) Tarred /opt/askapache/SOURCE/lockfile-progs-0.1.11 to /askapache-bk/tarred/#opt#SOURCE#lockfile-progs-0.1.11#-2010-11-18.tgz in 4 seconds Caveats Really this is very robust and foolproof, the only issues I ever have with it (I've been using this for years on my web servers) is if you run it in a directory and then a file changes in that directory, you get a warning message and your archive might have a problem for the changed file. This happens when running this in a logs directory, a temp dir, etc.. That's the only issue I've ever had, really nothing more than a heads up. Advanced: This is a simple alias, and very useful as it works on basically every linux box with semi-current tar and GNU coreutils, bash, and sed.. But if you want to customize it or pass parameters (like a dir to backup instead of pwd), check out this function I use.. this is what I created the alias from BTW, replacing my aa_status function with logger, and adding $SECONDS runtime instead of using tar's --totals function tarred () { local GZIP='--fast' PWD=${1:-`pwd`} F=$(date +${BKDIR}/%m-%d-%g-%H%M-`sed -u 's/[\/\ ]/#/g' [[ ! -r "$PWD" ]] && echo "Bad permissions for $PWD" 1>&2 && return 2; ( ( tar --totals --ignore-failed-read --transform "[email protected]^${PWD%/*}@`date +${PWD%/*}.%m-%d-%g`@S" -czPf $F $PWD && aa_status "Completed Tarp of $PWD to $F" ) & ) } #From my .bash_profile http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    8
    alias tarred='( ( D=`builtin pwd`; F=$(date +$HOME/`sed "s,[/ ],#,g" <<< ${D/${HOME}/}`#-%F.tgz); tar --ignore-failed-read --transform "s,^${D%/*},`date +${D%/*}.%F`,S" -czPf "$F" "$D" &>/dev/null ) & )'
    AskApache · 2010-11-18 06:24:34 0
  • The command uses ssh(1) to get to a remote host, uses tar(1) to archive a remote directory, prints the result to STDOUT, which is piped to gzip(1) to compress to a local file. In other words, we are archiving and compressing a remote directory to our local box.


    7
    ssh [email protected] "tar -cf - /path/to/dir" | gzip > dir.tar.gz
    atoponce · 2011-12-14 15:54:57 7
  • If you vim a compressed file it will list all archive content, then you can pickup any of them for editing and saving. There you have the modified archive without any extra step. It supports many file types such as tar.gz, tgz, zip, etc.


    6
    vim some-archive.tar.gz
    ktonga · 2012-04-20 02:37:28 1
  • command to decrypt: openssl enc -aes-256-cbc -d < secret.tar.enc | tar x Of course, don't forget to rm the original files ;) You may also want to look at the openssl docs for more options.


    5
    tar c folder_to_encrypt | openssl enc -aes-256-cbc -e > secret.tar.enc
    recursiverse · 2009-07-23 06:03:39 0
  • The lifehacker way: http://lifehacker.com/software/top/geek-to-live--encrypt-your-data-178005.php#Alternate%20Method:%20OpenSSL "That command will encrypt the unencrypted-data.tar file with the password you choose and output the result to encrypted-data.tar.des3. To unlock the encrypted file, use the following command:" openssl des3 -d -salt -in encrypted-data.tar.des3 -out unencrypted-data.tar Show Sample Output


    3
    openssl des3 -salt -in unencrypted-data.tar -out encrypted-data.tar.des3
    berot3 · 2009-10-03 03:50:46 3
  • You set the file/dirname transfer variable, in the end point you set the path destination, this command uses pipe view to show progress, compress the file outut and takes account to change the ssh cipher. Support dirnames with spaces. Merged ideas and comments by http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/4379/copy-working-directory-and-compress-it-on-the-fly-while-showing-progress and http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/3177/move-a-lot-of-files-over-ssh Show Sample Output


    3
    file='path to file'; tar -cf - "$file" | pv -s $(du -sb "$file" | awk '{print $1}') | gzip -c | ssh -c blowfish [email protected] tar -zxf - -C /opt/games
    starchox · 2010-01-19 16:02:45 0
  • Sometimes it is handy to be able to list contents of a tar file within a compressed archive, such as 7Zip in this instance, without having to extract the archive first. This is especially helpful when dealing with larger sized files.


    2
    7z x -so testfile.tar.7z | tar tvf -
    slashdot · 2009-07-15 21:00:58 1
  • Avoids creating useless directory entries in archive, and sorts files by (roughly) extension, which is likely to group similar files together for better compression. 1%-5% improvement.


    2
    find . \! -type d | rev | sort | rev | tar c --files-from=- --format=ustar | bzip2 --best > a.tar.bz2
    pornel · 2009-12-20 14:04:39 0
  • Transfer tar stream thru nc with pv montoiring taken from: http://www.catonmat.net/blog/unix-utilities-pipe-viewer/ Show Sample Output


    2
    #@source; tar -cf - /path/to/dir | pv | nc -l -p 6666 -q 5; #@target; nc 192.168.1.100 6666 | pv | tar -xf -
    hute37 · 2016-01-01 14:45:53 1
  • tar(1) and cpio(1) are not fully platform agnostic, although their file formats are specified in POSIX.1-2001. As such, GNU tar(1) might not be able to extract a BSD tar(1) archive, and ivce versa. pax(1) is defined in POSIX.1-2001. To extract an archive: pax -rf archive.tar


    2
    pax -wf archive.tar /path
    atoponce · 2020-03-06 13:56:46 1
  • Use tar command for a backup info with a date of creation Show Sample Output


    1
    tar --create --file /path/$HOSTNAME-my_name_file-$(date -I).tar.gz --atime-preserve -p -P --same-owner -z /path/
    Odin_sv · 2009-09-07 04:52:12 1
  • creates a compressed tar archive of files in /path/foo and writes to a timestamped filename in /path.


    1
    tar czf /path/archive_of_foo.`date -I`.tgz /path/foo
    Edward_Virtually · 2009-09-07 05:45:33 0
  • This is a shortcut to tar up all files matching a wildcard. Tar doesn't have the --include (apparently).


    1
    tar -czf ../header.tar.gz $(find . -name *.h)
    unixmonkey10524 · 2010-06-27 23:44:48 1
  •  1 2 3 >  Last ›

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Search for files older than 30 days in a directory and list only their names not the full path

Writes ID3 tags using the file name as the title.
Assumes that the files are named as such: 01-Filename.mp3 If your files are named differently, change the number of periods in the sed 's/...\(.*\)/\1' bit to match the numbers of characters you need to cut off the front of the file. Note: This only writes the titles.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Get the full path of a bash script's Git repository head.
Rather than complicated and fragile paths relative to a script like "../../other", this command will retrieve the full path of the file's repository head. Safe with spaces in directory names. Works within a symlinked directory. Broken down: $cd "$(dirname "${BASH_SOURCE[0]}")" temporarily changes directories within this expansion. Double quoted "$(dirname" and ")" with unquoted ${BASH_SOURCE[0]} allows spaces in the path. $git rev-parse --show-toplevel gets the full path of the repository head of the current working directory, which was temporarily changed by the "cd".

Burn CD/DVD from an iso, eject disc when finished.
cdrecord -scanbus will tell you the (x,y,z) value of your cdr (for example, mine is 3,0,0)

Search some text from all files inside a directory

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Hide comments
Hide comments and empty lines, included XML comments,

Use md5sum to check your music and movie files. Also use diff.
This is a beginning script. You can create a file with > filename. You can also use diff to compare output run at different times to verify no change in your files. I apologize in advance if this is too simple. For some it should be a start.

analyze traffic remotely over ssh w/ wireshark
commandline for mac os x


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: