Commands tagged column (29)

  • Particularly useful if you're mounting different drives, using the following command will allow you to see all the filesystems currently mounted on your computer and their respective specs with the added benefit of nice formatting. Show Sample Output


    308
    mount | column -t
    thechile · 2009-03-20 14:18:56 8
  • -n switch keeps empty columns If your distribution does not ship with a recent column version that supports -n you can use this alternative: perl -pe 's/(^|;);/$1 ;/g' file.csv | column -ts\; | less -S Change the delimiter to your liking.


    23
    column -tns: /etc/passwd
    bashrc · 2011-08-31 10:47:04 0
  • If you have used bash for any scripting, you've used the date command alot. It's perfect for using as a way to create filename's dynamically within aliases,functions, and commands like below.. This is actually an update to my first alias, since a few commenters (below) had good observations on what was wrong with my first command. # creating a date-based ssh-key for askapache.github.com ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/`date +git-$USER@$HOSTNAME-%m-%d-%g` -C 'webmaster@askapache.com' # /home/gpl/.ssh/git-gplnet@askapache.github.com-04-22-10 # create a tar+gzip backup of the current directory tar -czf $(date +$HOME/.backups/%m-%d-%g-%R-`sed -u 's/\//#/g' <<< $PWD`.tgz) . # tar -czf /home/gpl/.backups/04-22-10-01:13-#home#gpl#.rr#src.tgz . I personally find myself having to reference date --help quite a bit as a result. So this nice alias saves me a lot of time. This is one bdash mofo. Works in sh and bash (posix), but will likely need to be changed for other shells due to the parameter substitution going on.. Just extend the sed command, I prefer sed to pretty much everything anyways.. but it's always preferable to put in the extra effort to go for as much builtin use as you can. Otherwise it's not a top one-liner, it's a lazyboy recliner. Here's the old version: alias dateh='date --help|sed "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/!d;s/ \+/ /g"|while read l;do date "+ %${l/% */}_${l/% */}_${l#* }";done|column -s_ -t' This trick from my [ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html bash_profile ] Show Sample Output


    21
    alias dateh='date --help|sed -n "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/p"|while read l;do F=${l/% */}; date +%$F:"|'"'"'${F//%n/ }'"'"'|${l#* }";done|sed "s/\ *|\ */|/g" |column -s "|" -t'
    AskApache · 2010-04-21 01:22:18 5
  • Define a function vert () { echo $1 | grep -o '.'; } Use it to print some column headers paste <(vert several) <(vert parallel) <(vert vertical) <(vert "lines of") <(vert "text can") <(vert "be used") <(vert "for labels") <(vert "for columns") <(vert "of numbers") Show Sample Output


    12
    echo "vertical text" | grep -o '.'
    dennisw · 2009-09-11 03:45:04 1
  • since fuse mounts do not appear in /etc/mtab (fuse can't write there, dunno if it would if it could) this is propably a better way.


    10
    column -t /proc/mounts
    unixmonkey5049 · 2009-08-09 17:00:41 2
  • I like the other three versions but one uses nested loops and another prints every color on a separate line. Both versions fail to reset colors before giving the prompt back. This version uses the column command to print a table so all the colors fit on one screen. It also resets colors back to normal before as a last step.


    9
    for i in {0..255}; do echo -e "\e[38;05;${i}m${i}"; done | column -c 80 -s ' '; echo -e "\e[m"
    cout · 2010-07-21 17:30:36 1

  • 8
    awk -F ',' '{ x = x + $4 } END { print x }' test.csv
    coffeeaddict_nl · 2009-08-11 12:10:33 3
  • I love this function because it tells me everything I want to know about files, more than stat, more than ls. It's very useful and infinitely expandable. find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n' | sort -rgbS 50% 00761 drwxrw---x askapache:askapache 777:666 [06/10/10 | 06/10/10 | 06/10/10] [d] /web/cg/tmp The key is: # -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n' which believe it or not took me hundreds of tweaking before I was happy with the output. You can easily use this within a function to do whatever you want.. This simple function works recursively if you call it with -r as an argument, and sorts by file permissions. lsl(){ O="-maxdepth 1";sed -n '/-r/!Q1'<<<$@ &&O=;find $PWD $O -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n'|sort -rgbS 50%; } Personally I'm using this function because: lll () { local a KS="1 -r -g"; sed -n '/-sort=/!Q1' <<< $@ && KS=`sed 's/.*-sort=\(.*\)/\1/g'<<<$@`; find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n'|sort -k$KS -bS 50%; } # i can sort by user lll -sort=3 # or sort by group reversed lll -sort=4 -r # and sort by modification time lll -sort=6 If anyone wants to help me make this function handle multiple dirs/files like ls, go for it and I would appreciate it.. Something very minimal would be awesome.. maybe like: for a; do lll $a; done Note this uses the latest version of GNU find built from source, easy to build from gnu ftp tarball. Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    8
    find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n'
    AskApache · 2010-06-10 22:03:08 4
  • The -W switch of netstat makes it print complete URL of the connections, which otherwise by default is truncated to fit its default column size. Now to compensate for irregular column sizes, pipe the output to column (-t switch of column prints in tabular form). The only downside to this part is that the very first row, the header, goes pear shape. Show Sample Output


    6
    netstat -tup -W | column -t
    b_t · 2014-01-08 22:39:01 0
  • Prints out an ascii chart using builtin bash! Then formats using cat -t and column. The best part is: echo -e "${p: -3} \\0$(( $i/64*100 + $i%64/8*10 + $i%8 ))"; From: http://www.askapache.com/linux/ascii-codes-and-reference.html Show Sample Output


    6
    for i in {1..256};do p=" $i";echo -e "${p: -3} \\0$(($i/64*100+$i%64/8*10+$i%8))";done|cat -t|column -c120
    AskApache · 2014-04-04 16:54:53 2

  • 5
    perl -ne 'split /,/ ; $a+= $_[3]; END {print $a."\n";}' -f ./file.csv
    ioggstream · 2009-08-07 09:35:52 0

  • 3
    echo "vertical text" | fold -1
    zude · 2009-10-05 23:20:14 0
  • Using column to format a directory listing Show Sample Output


    3
    (printf "PERMISSIONS LINKS OWNER GROUP SIZE MONTH DAY HH:MM PROG-NAME\n" \ ; ls -l | sed 1d) | column -t
    opexxx · 2009-10-08 11:53:38 1
  • Once you get into advanced/optimized scripts, functions, or cli usage, you will use the sort command alot. The options are difficult to master/memorize however, and when you use sort commands as much as I do (some examples below), it's useful to have the help available with a simple alias. I love this alias as I never seem to remember all the options for sort, and I use sort like crazy (much better than uniq for example). # Sorts by file permissions find . -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %p\n' | sort -k1 -r -g -bS 20% 00761 drwxrw---x ./tmp 00755 drwxr-xr-x . 00701 drwx-----x ./askapache-m 00644 -rw-r--r-- ./.htaccess # Shows uniq history fast history 1000 | sed 's/^[0-9 ]*//' | sort -fubdS 50% exec bash -lxv export TERM=putty-256color Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    3
    alias sorth='sort --help|sed -n "/^ *-[^-]/s/^ *\(-[^ ]* -[^ ]*\) *\(.*\)/\1:\2/p"|column -ts":"'
    AskApache · 2010-06-10 21:30:31 0
  • This shows every bit of information that stat can get for any file, dir, fifo, etc. It's great because it also shows the format and explains it for each format option. If you just want stat help, create this handy alias 'stath' to display all format options with explanations. alias stath="stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'" To display on 2 lines: ( F=/etc/screenrc N=c IFS=$'\n'; for L in $(sed 's/%Z./%Z\n/'<<<`stat --h|sed -n '/^ *%/s/^ *%\(.\).*$/\1:%\1/p'`); do G=$(echo "stat -$N '$L' \"$F\""); eval $G; N=fc;done; ) For a similarly powerful stat-like function optimized for pretty output (and can sort by any field), check out the "lll" function http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5815/advanced-ls-output-using-find-for-formattedsortable-file-stat-info From my .bash_profile -> http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    3
    statt(){ C=c;stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'|while read l;do p=${l/% */};[ $p == %Z ]&&C=fc&&echo ^FS:^;echo "`stat -$C $p \"$1\"` ^$p^${l#%* }";done|column -ts^; }
    AskApache · 2010-06-11 23:31:03 0
  • Just an alternative with more advanced formating for readability purpose. It now uses colors (too much for me but it's a kind of proof-of-concept), and adjust columns. Show Sample Output


    3
    curl -u username --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | awk 'BEGIN{FS="\n";RS="(</entry>\n)?<entry>"}NR!=1{print "\033[1;31m"$9"\033[0;32m ("$10")\033[0m:\t\033[1;33m"$2"\033[0m"}' | sed -e 's,<[^>]*>,,g' | column -t -s $'\t'
    frntn · 2011-10-15 23:15:52 0
  • Spits out table that shows your Host->HostName aliases in ~/.ssh/config


    3
    awk '$1=="Host"{$1="";H=substr($0,2)};$1=="HostName"{print H,"$",$2}' ~/.ssh/config | column -s '$' -t
    wejn · 2014-05-24 20:51:47 0

  • 2
    cat /etc/passwd | column -nts:
    kev · 2011-08-31 02:08:20 3
  • This takes all of the tab spaces, and uses column to put them into the appropriately sized table. Show Sample Output


    2
    netstat -pnut -W | column -t -s $'\t'
    Nadiar · 2014-05-03 00:48:53 0
  • More of the same but with more elaborate perl-fu :-)


    1
    perl -F',' -ane '$a += $F[3]; END { print $a }' test.csv
    coffeeaddict_nl · 2009-08-11 15:08:58 0
  • An advantage is that this doesn't modify remained string at all. One can change {0,1} with {0,n} to drop several columns


    1
    perl -pE's/(\S+\s*){0,1}//'
    pung96 · 2015-05-09 15:14:58 0
  • This version now adds a header with consecutive numbering. Show Sample Output


    0
    cat file.csv | perl -pe 'if($. == 1) {@h = split(/;/); $i = 1 ; map { $_ = $i; $i++ } @h; print join(" ;", @h) , "\n"} ; s/(^|;);/$1 ;/g' | column -ts\; | less -S
    bashrc · 2011-08-31 12:52:02 1

  • 0
    awk '$3==$4' /etc/passwd
    totti · 2011-09-15 19:13:18 0
  • Display the 1st field (employee name) from a colon delimited file Show Sample Output


    0
    cut -d: -f 1 names.txt
    ankush108 · 2012-06-26 19:28:25 0
  • Something I do a lot is extract columns from some input where cut is not suitable because the columns are separated by not a single character but multiple spaces or tabs. So I often do things like: ... | awk '{print $7, $8}' ... which is a lot of typing, additionally slowed down when typing symbols like '{}$ ... Using the simple one-line function above makes it easier and faster: ... | col 7 8 How it works: The one-liner defines a new function with name col The function will execute awk, and it expects standard input (coming from a pipe or input redirection) The function arguments are processed with sed to use them with awk: replace all spaces with ,$ so that for example 1 2 3 becomes 1,$2,$3, which is inserted into the awk command to become the well formatted shell command: awk '{print $1,$2,$3}' Allows negative indexes to extract columns relative to the end of the line. Credit: http://www.bashoneliners.com/oneliners/oneliner/144/ Show Sample Output


    0
    col() { awk '{print $('$(echo $* | sed -e s/-/NF-/g -e 's/ /),$(/g')')}'; }
    tekniq · 2014-06-05 18:01:31 0
  •  1 2 > 

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Fix for error perl: warning: Setting locale failed.
Fix for ubuntu error: perl: warning: Setting locale failed. perl: warning: Please check that your locale settings: LANGUAGE = "en_GB:en", LC_ALL = (unset), LANG = "en_GB.UTF-8" are supported and installed on your system. perl: warning: Falling back to the standard locale ("C"). locale: Cannot set LC_CTYPE to default locale: No such file or directory locale: Cannot set LC_MESSAGES to default locale: No such file or directory locale: Cannot set LC_ALL to default locale: No such file or directory

to see about php configure
see about php install configure

Show the date of easter
ncal -e shows the date of Easter this year. ncal -e YYYY shows the date of Easter in a given year. ncal -o works the same way, but for Orthodox dates.

find out how many days since given date
You can also do this for seconds, minutes, hours, etc... Can't use dates before the epoch, though.

Show used disk space:

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Sort processes by CPU Usage
Short list about top 10 processes, sorted by CPU usage

colorize your svn diff
Will colorize your svn diff.

Determine the version of a specific package with RPM
In this case, I'm getting the package version for 'redhat-release', but of course, this can be applied to any package installed on the filesystem. This is very handy in scripts that need to determine just the version of the package, without the package name and all the sed and grep hackery to get to the data you want. To find out all the support format strings that 'rpm --qf' supports: $ rpm --querytags

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: