Commands by thechile (3)

  • bit of a contrived example and playing to my OCD but nice for quick scripted output of listening ports which is sorted by port, ip address and protocol. Show Sample Output


    0
    sudo netstat -plntu --inet | sort -t: -k2,2n | sort --stable -t. -k 1,1n -k 2,2n -k 3,3n -k 4,4n | sort -s -t" " -k1,1
    thechile · 2013-08-13 09:21:26 0
  • ..not guaranteed to always be accurate but fun to see how old you Linux installation is based on the root partitions file system creation date. Show Sample Output


    12
    sudo tune2fs -l $(df -h / |(read; awk '{print $1; exit}')) | grep -i created
    thechile · 2013-08-08 15:18:09 5
  • Particularly useful if you're mounting different drives, using the following command will allow you to see all the filesystems currently mounted on your computer and their respective specs with the added benefit of nice formatting. Show Sample Output


    319
    mount | column -t
    thechile · 2009-03-20 14:18:56 9

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