Commands by thechile (3)

  • bit of a contrived example and playing to my OCD but nice for quick scripted output of listening ports which is sorted by port, ip address and protocol. Show Sample Output


    0
    sudo netstat -plntu --inet | sort -t: -k2,2n | sort --stable -t. -k 1,1n -k 2,2n -k 3,3n -k 4,4n | sort -s -t" " -k1,1
    thechile · 2013-08-13 09:21:26 0
  • ..not guaranteed to always be accurate but fun to see how old you Linux installation is based on the root partitions file system creation date. Show Sample Output


    12
    sudo tune2fs -l $(df -h / |(read; awk '{print $1; exit}')) | grep -i created
    thechile · 2013-08-08 15:18:09 5
  • Particularly useful if you're mounting different drives, using the following command will allow you to see all the filesystems currently mounted on your computer and their respective specs with the added benefit of nice formatting. Show Sample Output


    303
    mount | column -t
    thechile · 2009-03-20 14:18:56 7

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save date and time for each command in history
Date-time format: YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS

Display all shell functions set in the current shell environment
Uses the shell builtin `declare` with the '-f' flag to output only functions to grep out only the function names. You can use it as an alias or function like so: alias shfunctions="builtin declare -f | command grep --color=never -E '^[a-zA-Z_]+\ \(\)'" shfunctions () { builtin declare -f | command grep --color=never -E '^[a-zA-Z_]+\ \(\)'; }

connects to a serial console
cu (call UNIX) establishes a full-duplex connection to another machine (*BSD) using a serial console. It becames more useful than screen if you have to send a BREAK signal. using cu just type "~#". $man cu http://www.openbsd.org/cgi-bin/man.cgi?query=cu&apropos=0&sektion=0&manpath=OpenBSD+Current&arch=i386&format=html

Record and share your terminal
It replays plain text terminal screencast from http://shelr.tv/

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Deal with dot files safely

Forget remembered path locations of previously ran commands
i.e.: Useful if you add ~/bin to your $PATH and you want to override locations of previously ran commands and you don't want to log out and log back in to be able to use them.

Find the package that installed a command

delete a particular line by line number in file
deletes line 3 in known_hosts text file

Update dyndns.org with your external IP.
This is great if you are behind a router that does not support dynamic dns updates! Example: AT&T u-verse gateway... Put this in a script and run it as a cron job.


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