ping with timestamp

ping HOSTNAME | while read pong; do echo "$(date): $pong"; done

2
By: sammcj
2011-09-07 02:03:19

These Might Interest You

  • Nasty perl one-liner that provides a sparkline of ping times. If you want a different history than the last 30, just put that value in. It (ab)uses unicode to draw the bars, inspired by https://github.com/joemiller/spark-ping . It's not the most bug-free piece of code, but what it lacks in robustness it makes up for in capability. :) If anyone has any ideas on how to make it more compact or better, I'd love to hear them. I included a ping to google in the command just as an example (and burned up 10 chars doing it!). You should use it with: $ ping example.com | $SPARKLINE_PING_COMMAND Show Sample Output


    2
    ping g.co|perl -ne'$|=/e=(\S+)/||next;(push@_,$1)>30&&shift@_;print"\r",(map{"\xe2\x96".chr(128+7*$_/(sort{$b<=>$a}@_)[0])." "}@_),"$1ms"'
    bartgrantham · 2012-07-06 22:42:06 0
  • tstouch takes two arguments: a filename containing a timestamp, and an extended regular expression with the parenthesized section matching a timestamp of the form YYYYMMDDhhmm or YYYYMMDDhhmm.ss. It then touches the file with that timestamp. Show Sample Output


    2
    tstouch() { [[ $1 =~ $2 ]] && touch -t ${BASH_REMATCH[1]} $1; }
    bartonski · 2013-10-01 20:00:34 0
  • If you're very busy and don't want to wait for a ping response, use it. This command will be waiting for a successful ping response, to play a sound file to warn you that the target host is available.


    0
    continuar=true; while $continuar; do if ping -c 3 [target_IP_address] 2>&1> /dev/null ; then mplayer [sound_file]; continuar=false; break; fi; done
    mack · 2011-04-25 21:44:05 4
  • This version combines the best of the other suggestions and adds these features: 1. It scans a /16 subnet 2. It is very fast by running the ping commands in the background, running them in parallel. 3. Does not use the "-W" option as that's not available in older ping versions (I needed this for OS X 10.5)


    0
    prefix="169.254" && for i in {0..254}; do echo $prefix.$i/8; for j in {1..254}; do sh -c "ping -m 1 -c 1 -t 1 $prefix.$i.$j | grep \"icmp\" &" ; done; done
    tempelorg · 2012-07-25 12:07:15 0

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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