Commands by k2s (3)

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Watch the progress of 'dd'
The 'dd' command doesn't provide a progress when writing data. So, sending the "USR1" signal to the process will spit out its progress as it writes data. This command is superior to others on the site, as it doesn't require you to previously know the PID of the dd command.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

list files recursively by size

total percentage of memory use for all processes with a given name
This command will add up RAM usage of all processes whose name contains "java" and output the sum of percentages in HRF. Also, unlike the original #15430, it wont fail on processes with a usage of >9.9%. Pleases note that this command wont work reliably in use cases where a significant portion of processes involved are using less than 0.1% of RAM, because they will be counted as "0", even though a great number of them could add up to significant amounts.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Random quote from Borat
I improved a bit on the original by only using sed and extracting the quote with a matching group. Use -nE for sed on Mac OSX Use -nr for sed on Linux. Warning! The quotes from Borat are definitely offensive.

Extract tarball from internet without local saving

Quickly analyse an Apache error log
This searches the Apache error_log for each of the 5 most significant Apache error levels, if any are found the date is then cut from the output in order to sort then print the most common occurrence of each error.

Extract rpm package name, version and release using some fancy sed regex
This command could seem pretty pointless especially when you can get the same result more easily using the rpm builtin queryformat, like: $ rpm -qa --qf "%{NAME} %{VERSION} %{RELEASE}.%{ARCH}\n" | sort | column -t but nonetheless I've learned that sometimes it can be quite interesting trying to explore alternative ways to accomplish the same task (as Perl folks like to say: There's more than one way to do it!)


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