Commands by fazen (1)

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Diff two directories by finding and comparing the md5 checksums of their contents.
Compute the md5 checksums for the contents of two mirrored directories, then sort and diff the results. If everything matches, nothing is returned. Otherwise, any checksums which do not match, or which exist in one tree but not the other, are returned. As you might imagine, the output is useful only if no errors are found, because only the checksums, not filenames, are returned. I hope to address this, or that someone else will!

Find last reboot time
Displays time of last system boot

Generate map of your hardware

Top 10 Memory Processes
It displays the top 10 processes sorted by memory usage

Get the serial numbers from HP RAID
This dumps serial numbers of all the drives but HP warranty check does not say they are valid ...

RTFM function
RTFMFTW.

Get info about a GitHub project
In this example we search for 'vim' but vim doesn't have a project on github right now. That's ok, this command still searches for every project that has 'vim' in their description (forks, plugins, etc). To get XML or JSON output just replace 'yaml' in the url with 'xml' or 'json'.

Determine if a port is open with bash
For times when netcat isn't available. Will throw a Connection refused message if a port is closed. Scriptable: $ (: /dev/null && echo "OPEN" || echo "CLOSED"

Remount root in read-write mode.
Saved my day, when my harddrive got stuck in read-only mode.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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