Mount proc

mount -t proc{,,}
Run this in / in a chroot to get your own proc there.

5
By: alexfoo
2009-02-26 12:53:58

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  • Automatically drops mount points that have non-numeric sizes (e.g. /proc). Tested in bash on Linux and AIX. Show Sample Output


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    drockney · 2013-07-29 20:12:39 0
  • The command is useful when, e.g., booting an existing system with a rescue or installation CD where you need to chroot into the hard-disk and be able to do stuff which accesses kernel info (e.g. when installing Ubuntu desktop with LVM2 you need to mount and chroot the hard disk from a shell window in order to install packages and run initramfs inside chroot). The command assumes that /mnt/xxx is where the chroot'ed environment's root file system on the hard disk is mounted.


    3
    for i in sys dev proc; do sudo mount --bind /$i /mnt/xxx/$i; done
    amosshapira · 2009-04-20 16:52:14 1
  • Mount an smb share with this command. other options -ousername=$USERr,gid=$groupname,scope=rw


    1
    mount -t smbfs //$server/share /local/mount -o rw,username=$USER
    sufoo · 2009-03-25 01:05:17 2
  • Necessary for fsck for example. The remount functionality follows the standard way how the mount command works with options from fstab. It means the mount command doesn't read fstab (or mtab) only when a device and dir are fully specified. After this call all old mount options are replaced and arbitrary stuff from fstab is ignored, except the loop= option which is internally generated and maintained by the mount command. It does not change device or mount point.


    1
    mount -o remount,ro /dev/foo /
    vlan7 · 2010-10-30 03:51:53 1

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