Commands by matthewbauer (52)

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Export log to html file
Logtool is a nice tool that can export log file to various format, but its strength lies in the capacity of colorize logs. This command take a log as input and colorize it, then export it to an html file for a more confortable view. Logtool is part of logtool package.Tested on Debian.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

add all files not under version control to repository
This should handle whitespaces well and will not get confused if your filenames have "?" in them

Make redirects to localhost via /etc/hosts more interesting
Normally when a site is blocked through /etc/hosts, traffic is just being redirected to a non-existent server that isn't going to respond. This helps get your point across a little more clearly than a browser timeout. Of course you could use any number of codes: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_HTTP_status_codes Obviously, this command can be added to init-rc.d, and more sophisticated responses can be given. Seems noteworthy to mention that the information sent from the browser can be parsed using the bash READ builtin (such as 'while read -t 1 statement; do parsing'), and the connection stays open until the script exits. Take care that you must use EXEC:'bash -c foo.sh', as 'execvp' (socat's method for executing scripts) invokes 'sh', not 'bash'.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Debug SSH at the Maximum Verbosity Level
When debugging an ssh connection either to optimize your settings ie compression, ciphers, or more commonly for debugging an issue connecting, this alias comes in real handy as it's not easy to remember the '-o LogLevel=DEBUG3' argument, which adds a boost of debugging info not available with -vvv alone. Especially useful are the FD info, and the setup negotiation to create a cleaner, faster connection.

Recursively scan directories for mp3s and pass them to mplayer
The command first deletes any old playlist calles playlist.tmp under /tmp. After that it recursively searches all direcotries under ~/mp3 and stores the result in /tmp/playlist.tmp. After havin created the playlist, the command will execute mplayer which will shuffle through the playlist. This command is aliased to m is aliased to `rm -rf /tmp/playlist.tmp && find ~/mp3 -name *.mp3 > /tmp/playlist.tmp && mplayer -playlist /tmp/playlist.tmp -shuffle -loop 0 | grep Playing' in my ~/.bashrc.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Remove all zero size files from current directory (not recursive)
works only in zsh

Check if a remote port is up using dnstools.com (i.e. from behind a firewall/proxy)
Shell function; returns 0 if the port is up, 1 otherwise (check $? after executing). First parameter: IP address/hostname Second parameter: port number There is no error checking for the input parameters.


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