Commands tagged hardware (17)

  • Yields entries in the form of "/dev/hda1" etc. Use this if you are on a new system and don't know how the storage hardware (ide, sata, scsi, usb - with ever changing descriptors) is connected and which partitions are available. Far better than using "fdisk -l" on guessed device descriptors. Show Sample Output


    13
    hwinfo --block --short
    Schneckentreiber · 2009-04-24 11:13:31 4
  • Loop is needed if you have more then one card. Show Sample Output


    4
    for I in `/sbin/lspci |awk '/VGA/{print $1}'`;do /sbin/lspci -v -s $I;done
    houghi · 2010-10-26 19:02:26 0
  • This command lists the names of your USB devices connected and what file in /dev they are using. It's pretty useful if you don't have an automount option in your desktop or you don't have any graphical enviroment. Show Sample Output


    2
    ls -la /dev/disk/by-id/usb-*
    casidiablo · 2009-11-25 16:02:06 0
  • This command tell you if your hardware is 32 or 64 bits even if you install a 32bits OS on a 64 bits hardware. If your distro don't support the -q switch, try doing : grep &>/dev/null '\<lm\>' /proc/cpuinfo && echo 64 bits || echo 32 bits


    2
    grep -q '\<lm\>' /proc/cpuinfo && echo 64 bits || echo 32 bits
    sputnick · 2013-02-09 13:01:36 0
  • probably only works if you have one graphics card. used this: http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/howto-find-linux-vga-video-card-ram/ as reference can be expanded, for example: lspci -v -s `lspci | awk '/VGA/{print $1}'` | sed -n '/Memory.*, prefetchable/s/.*\[size=\([^]]\+\)\]/\1/p' will just get the amount of prefetchable memory compare to: lshw -C display which does not give the size (it does give byte ranges and you could calculate the size from that, but that's a pain) Also uses a command which is not standard on linux; wheras lspci is a core utility provided by most systems Show Sample Output


    1
    lspci -v -s `lspci | awk '/VGA/{print $1}'`
    infinull · 2010-10-26 17:45:14 1
  • Find installed network devices. Show Sample Output


    1
    sudo lshw -C network
    cantormath · 2012-06-07 10:32:49 0

  • 1
    dbus-send --session --print-reply --dest="org.gnome.SettingsDaemon" /org/gnome/SettingsDaemon/Power org.gnome.SettingsDaemon.Power.Screen.SetPercentage uint32:30
    totti · 2013-02-04 11:21:07 0
  • CPU flags: rm --> 16-bit processor (real mode) tm --> 32-bit processor (? mode) lm --> 64-bit processor (long mode)


    1
    cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep " lm " > /dev/null && echo 64 bits || echo 32 bits
    agd · 2013-02-11 22:54:26 0
  • Formats the output from `ioreg` into XML, then parses the XML with `xmllint`'s xpath feature. Show Sample Output


    1
    ioreg -ad2 -c IOPlatformExpertDevice | xmllint --xpath '//key[.="IOPlatformUUID"]/following-sibling::*[1]/text()' -
    n8felton · 2018-08-18 21:19:47 1
  • Avoids cat abuse ;)


    0
    grep " lm " /proc/cpuinfo > /dev/null && echo "64-bit" || echo "32-bit"
    MrCode · 2013-02-19 21:40:44 0
  • Info about Bluetooth devices. Show Sample Output


    0
    hciconfig;hciconfig -a hci0;lsmod |grep bt;dmesg | grep tooth
    FadeMind · 2013-08-21 12:29:23 1
  • Gets the Hardware UUID of the current machine using system_profiler. Show Sample Output


    0
    system_profiler SPHardwareDataType | awk '/UUID/ { print $3; }'
    thealanberman · 2014-07-25 06:54:40 0

  • 0
    ioreg -d2 -c IOPlatformExpertDevice | awk -F\" '/IOPlatformUUID/{print $(NF-1)}'
    n8felton · 2018-08-18 21:18:20 0

  • -1
    ioreg -lw0 | grep IODisplayEDID | sed "/[^<]*</s///" | xxd -p -r | strings -6
    unixmonkey4003 · 2009-05-29 18:52:12 0

  • -1
    uname -m
    wee0x1b · 2013-02-15 17:23:44 0
  • Prints the type of computer you have. I think this should be used more in distros and other applications because it is so easy to get. This can also be asked by tutorials as an easy way to get your base hardware. Some alternatives: sudo dmidecode -s system-product-name and sudo smbios-sys-info-lite | sed -n 's/^Product Name: *\(.*\)/\1/p' Show Sample Output


    -2
    cat /sys/devices/virtual/dmi/id/board_name
    matthewbauer · 2010-04-22 03:21:40 4
  • CPU flags: rm --> 16-bit processor (real mode) tm --> 32-bit processor (? mode) lm --> 64-bit processor (long mode)


    -4
    if [[ lm = $(cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep " lm ") ]] ; then echo "64 bits" ; else echo "32 bits" ; fi
    agd · 2013-02-11 22:40:46 0

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Show one line summaries of all DEB packages installed on Ubuntu based on pattern search
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run complex remote shell cmds over ssh, without escaping quotes
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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
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list files recursively by size

save date and time for each command in history
Date-time format: YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS

Record a webcam output into a video file.
The option -an disables audio recording, -f forces the use of video4linux for the input, -s sets the video to the size 320x240, -b sets the recording bitrate, -r sets the frame rate to 15fps, -i gives the input device, -vcodec sets the output format. Press Q to stop recording or you can specify the recording time with the -t option like -t 00:1:30

drop first column of output by piping to this

Use a Gmail virtual disk (GmailFS) on Ubuntu
Packages: gmailfs fuse-utils libfuse2 gvfs-fuse Config files: /etc/gmailfs/gmailfs.conf; ~/.gmailfs.conf (make a copy from the another one) Unmount: $ fusermount -u /mount/path/ /etc/fstab (Optional): none /mount/path/ gmailfs noauto,user[,username=USERNAME,password=PASSWORD,fsname=VOLUME] 0 0 NOTES: - The options between [] are optional since they already setuped on the config files. - The '-p' flag shows a prompt for the password entry. - It's necessary to add the user to the 'fuse' group. You can do that with: $ sudo chgrp fuse /dev/fuse and $ sudo usermod -a -G fuse USER - The volume name is not needed but highly recommended to avoid file corruption. Also choose a non-trivial name. - Google doesn't approve the use of Gmail account other than e-mail purposes. So, I recommend the creation of a new account for this.

Extract extention of a file


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