Commands tagged brightness (7)

  • [UPDATE: Now works for multiple connected outputs] I woke up around midnight with an urge to do some late night hacking, but I didn't want a bright monitor screwing up my body's circadian rhythm. I've heard that at night blue (short wavelength) lights are particularly bad for your diurnal clock. That may be a bunch of hooey, but it is true that redder (longer wavelength) colors are easier on my eyes at night. This command makes the screen dimmer and adjusts the gamma curves to improve contrast, particularly darkening blues and greens (Rɣ=2, Gɣ=3, Bɣ=4). To reset your screen to normal, you can run this command: xrandr | sed -n 's/ connected.*//p' | xargs -n1 -tri xrandr --output {} --brightness 1 --gamma 1:1:1 or, more briefly, xgamma -g 1 Note: The sed part is fragile and wrong. I'm doing it this way because of a misfeature in xrandr(1), which requires an output be specified but has no programmatic way of querying available outputs. Someone needs to patch up xrandr to be shell script friendly or at least add virtual outputs named "PRIMARY" and "ALL". . Todo: Screen should dim (gradually) at sunset and brighten at sunrise. I think this could be done with a self-resubmitting at job, but I'm running into the commandlinefu 127 character limit just getting the sunrise time: wget http://aa.usno.navy.mil/cgi-bin/aa_pap.pl --post-data=$(date "+xxy=%Y&xxm=%m&xxd=%d")"&st=WA&place=Seattle" -q -O- | sed -rn 's/\W*Sunrise\W*(.*)/\1/p' I hope some clever hacker comes up with a command line interface to Google's "OneBox", since the correct time shows up as the first hit when googling for "sunrise:cityname". . [Thank you to @flatcap for the sed improvement, which is much better than the head|tail|cut silliness I had before. And thank you to @braunmagrin for pointing out that the "connected" output may not be on the second line.] Show Sample Output


    3
    xrandr | sed -n 's/ connected.*//p' | xargs -n1 -tri xrandr --output {} --brightness 0.7 --gamma 2:3:4
    hackerb9 · 2010-10-24 10:45:57 7

  • 3
    xbacklight -10%
    totti · 2013-01-17 17:53:05 0
  • Redshift will adjust the color temperature and protects eye at night -b : will adjust the brightness


    2
    redshiftgui -o -b 0.5
    totti · 2012-02-26 16:10:02 0
  • I'm not sure what apt this is, but it seems to work on most X screens, an is useful for saving power, and not straining your eyes Show Sample Output


    2
    xbacklight -set 50
    gabe240 · 2014-02-07 12:03:57 0

  • 1
    dbus-send --session --print-reply --dest="org.gnome.SettingsDaemon" /org/gnome/SettingsDaemon/Power org.gnome.SettingsDaemon.Power.Screen.SetPercentage uint32:30
    totti · 2013-02-04 11:21:07 0
  • xrandr --output <outputname> --brightness <value> If the driver of your graphics card supports it, then you can use xrandr. The following command lists the current configuration: xrandr --current --verbose If you want to change the configuration of an output, then you need the name of the output. This name is part of the output of xrandr --current, for example LVDS1. The brightness can be changed like this: xrandr --output <outputname> --brightness 0.8 Gamma: xrandr --output <outputname> --gamma 0.5:1.0:1.0


    0
    xrandr --output LVDS1 --brightness 0.4
    totti · 2013-02-04 11:00:16 0
  • alias screen-brightness='xbacklight -set' alias screen-off='xset dpms force standby' alias screen-min='xbacklight -set 1' alias screen-max='xbacklight -set 100' alias screen-inc='xbacklight -inc 10' alias screen-dec='xbacklight -dec 10'


    0
    xbacklight -set 100
    asdzxc · 2015-02-08 12:12:16 0

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

auto terminal title change
above line in .bash_profile will give you window title in putty or terminal client when you login to your remote server

Create the four oauth keys required for a Twitter stream feed
Twitter stream feeds now require authentication. This command is the FIRST in a set of five commands you'll need to get Twitter authorization for your final Twitter command. *** IMPORTANT *** Before you start, you have to get some authorization info for your "app" from Twitter. Carefully follow the instructions below: Go to dev.twitter.com/apps and choose "Create a new application". Fill in the form. You can pick any name for your app. After submitting, click on "Create my access token". Keep the resulting page open, as you'll need information from it below. If you closed the page, or want to get back to it in the future, just go to dev.twitter.com/apps Now customize FIVE THINGS on the command line as follows: 1. Replace the string "Consumer key" by copying & pasting your custom consumer key from the Twitter apps page. 2. Replace the string "Consumer secret" by copying & pasting your consumer secret from the Twitter apps page. 3. Replace the string "Access token" by copying & pasting your access token from the Twitter apps page. 4. Replace string "Access token secret" by copying & pasting your own token secret from the Twitter apps page. 5. Replace the string 19258798 with the Twitter UserID NUMBER (this is **NOT** the normal Twitter NAME of the user you want the tweet feed from. If you don't know the UserID number, head over to www.idfromuser.com and type in the user's regular Twitter name. The site will return their Twitter UserID number to you. 19258798 is the Twitter UserID for commandlinefu, so if you don't change that, you'll receive commandlinefu tweets, uhm... on the commandline :) Congratulations! You're done creating all the keys! Environment variables k1, k2, k3, and k4 now hold the four Twitter keys you will need for your next step. The variables should really have been named better, e.g. "Consumer_key", but in later commands the 256-character limit forced me to use short, unclear names here. Just remember k stands for "key". Again, remember, you can always review your requested Twitter keys at dev.twitter.com/apps. Our command line also creates four additional environment variables that are needed in the oauth process: "once", "ts", "hmac" and "id". "once" is a random number used only once that is part of the oauth procedure. HMAC is the actual key that will be used later for signing the base string. "ts" is a timestamp in the Posix time format. The last variable (id) is the user id number of the Twitter user you want to get feeds from. Note that id is ***NOT*** the twitter name, if you didn't know that, see www.idfromuser.com If you want to learn more about oauth authentication, visit oauth.net and/or go to dev.twitter.com/apps, click on any of your apps and then click on "Oauth tool" Now go look at my next command, i.e. step2, to see what happens next to these eight variables.

Skip filenames with control characters, a.k.a tab,newline etc

return a titlecased version of the string[str.title() in python]

SSH connection through host in the middle
Unreachable_host is unavailable from local network, but it's available from reachable_host's network. This command creates a connection to unreachable_host through "hidden" connection to reachable_host.

lists files and folders in a folder
lists files and folders in a folder with summary.

Edit a file in vim (at the first error) if it is not well formed xml.
Validate a file using xmllint. If there are parser errors, edit the file in vim at the line of the first error.

Upgrade all perl modules via CPAN

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Mount a Windows share on the local network (Ubuntu) with user rights and use a specific samba user


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: