Commands tagged xrandr (12)

  • i spent way too many hours trying to fiddle with /etc/X11/xorg.conf trying to hook up various external projectors. too bad i didn't know this would solve all my problems.


    8
    xrandr --auto
    kanzure · 2009-12-30 18:52:02 1
  • -s must be a valid resolution. You can get a list of valid (and supported) resolutions via `xrandr`.


    4
    xrandr -s 1280x1024
    ivanatora · 2010-02-26 10:56:14 0
  • [UPDATE: Now works for multiple connected outputs] I woke up around midnight with an urge to do some late night hacking, but I didn't want a bright monitor screwing up my body's circadian rhythm. I've heard that at night blue (short wavelength) lights are particularly bad for your diurnal clock. That may be a bunch of hooey, but it is true that redder (longer wavelength) colors are easier on my eyes at night. This command makes the screen dimmer and adjusts the gamma curves to improve contrast, particularly darkening blues and greens (Rɣ=2, Gɣ=3, Bɣ=4). To reset your screen to normal, you can run this command: xrandr | sed -n 's/ connected.*//p' | xargs -n1 -tri xrandr --output {} --brightness 1 --gamma 1:1:1 or, more briefly, xgamma -g 1 Note: The sed part is fragile and wrong. I'm doing it this way because of a misfeature in xrandr(1), which requires an output be specified but has no programmatic way of querying available outputs. Someone needs to patch up xrandr to be shell script friendly or at least add virtual outputs named "PRIMARY" and "ALL". . Todo: Screen should dim (gradually) at sunset and brighten at sunrise. I think this could be done with a self-resubmitting at job, but I'm running into the commandlinefu 127 character limit just getting the sunrise time: wget http://aa.usno.navy.mil/cgi-bin/aa_pap.pl --post-data=$(date "+xxy=%Y&xxm=%m&xxd=%d")"&st=WA&place=Seattle" -q -O- | sed -rn 's/\W*Sunrise\W*(.*)/\1/p' I hope some clever hacker comes up with a command line interface to Google's "OneBox", since the correct time shows up as the first hit when googling for "sunrise:cityname". . [Thank you to @flatcap for the sed improvement, which is much better than the head|tail|cut silliness I had before. And thank you to @braunmagrin for pointing out that the "connected" output may not be on the second line.] Show Sample Output


    3
    xrandr | sed -n 's/ connected.*//p' | xargs -n1 -tri xrandr --output {} --brightness 0.7 --gamma 2:3:4
    hackerb9 · 2010-10-24 10:45:57 7
  • This forces X back to its maximum resolution configured. To get a list, type `xrandr'.


    2
    xrandr -s 0
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 07:38:01 0

  • 1
    xrandr | grep \* | awk '{print $1}'
    sgnn7 · 2013-12-06 17:45:49 0
  • HDMI-1 is the interface in the example, which can be obtained just by typing xrandr and surfing through the output. There are a hell lot of configurations that can be done but I prefer auto because it works in most cases. Lifesaver Show Sample Output


    1
    xrandr --output < interface-name > --auto
    praton · 2018-08-23 17:51:20 0
  • This command first determines whether a second screen is connected. If this is the case, it sets the screen's RGB gamma via xrandr. Useful for cheap or slightly defective monitors with a tint. In this example a yellowing/champagne color deviation is compensated for by decreasing the red and the green portion of the image.


    1
    secondscreen=$(xrandr -q | grep " connected" | sed -n '2 p' | cut -f 1 -d ' '); [ "$secondscreen" ] && xrandr --output $secondscreen --gamma 0.6:0.75:1
    lordtoran · 2019-10-28 13:12:08 6

  • 0
    xrandr -q | awk -F'current' -F',' 'NR==1 {gsub("( |current)","");print $2}'
    sputnick · 2010-02-02 16:26:17 0
  • Run a xrandr -q to get resolutions of displays. Put top resolution after --fb Divide top resolution by each display's resolution to get scale. Works for projectors, for instance.


    0
    xrandr --fb 1920x1080 --output LVDS1 --scale 1.5x1.35 --output HDMI1 --mode 1920x1080
    dizzi90 · 2013-10-23 22:25:30 0
  • if there are multiple monitors, this command uses multiple lines Show Sample Output


    0
    xrandr | awk '/*/ {print $1}'
    misterhat · 2015-12-21 15:29:39 0
  • to view on another box: nc <server address> <port> | ffplay - use -r to adjust FPS and -q to adjust compression. use on trusted network only as nc is unencrypted.


    0
    ffmpeg -f x11grab -s $(xrandr | awk '/*/ {print $1}') -r 10 -i :0 -an -q 10 -f mjpeg - | nc -lp <port>
    misterhat · 2015-12-21 17:15:30 0

  • -1
    xrandr -q | grep -w Screen
    hemanth · 2010-02-14 15:38:49 0

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

FizzBuzz in one line of Bash
The (in)famous "FizzBuzz" programming challenge, answered in a single line of Bash code. The "|column" part at the end merely formats the output a bit, so if "column" is not installed on your machine you can simply omit that part. Without "|column", the solution only uses 75 characters. The version below is expanded to multiple lines, with comments added. for i in {1..100} # Use i to loop from "1" to "100", inclusive. do ((i % 3)) && # If i is not divisible by 3... x= || # ...blank out x (yes, "x= " does that). Otherwise,... x=Fizz # ...set x to the string "Fizz". ((i % 5)) || # If i is not divisible by 5, skip (there's no "&&")... x+=Buzz # ...Otherwise, append (not set) the string "Buzz" to x. echo ${x:-$i} # Print x unless it is blanked out. Otherwise, print i. done | column # Wrap output into columns (not part of the test).

Check if system is 32bit or 64bit

list files recursively by size

drop first column of output by piping to this

backup local MySQL database into a folder and removes older then 5 days backups

rename a file to its md5sum

easily find megabyte eating files or directories
This is easy to type if you are looking for a few (hundred) "missing" megabytes (and don't mind the occasional K slipping in)... A variation without false positives and also finding gigabytes (but - depending on your keyboard setup - more painful to type): $du -hs *|grep -P '^(\d|,)+(M|G)'|sort -n (NOTE: you might want to replace the ',' according to your locale!) Don't forget that you can modify the globbing as needed! (e.g. '.[^\.]* *' to include hidden files and directories (w/ bash)) in its core similar to: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/706/show-sorted-list-of-files-with-sizes-more-than-1mb-in-the-current-dir

Convert files from DOS line endings to UNIX line endings
This method will also convert mac line endings.

Delete all empty lines from a file with vim

Update twitter via curl (and also set the "from" bit)
An improvement of the original (at: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/2872/update-twitter-via-curl) in the sense that you see a "from cURL" under your status message instead of just a "from API" ;-) Twitter automatically links it to the cURL home page.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: