Commands by FadeMind (5)

  • Info about Bluetooth devices. Show Sample Output


    0
    hciconfig;hciconfig -a hci0;lsmod |grep bt;dmesg | grep tooth
    FadeMind · 2013-08-21 12:29:23 0
  • Advanced information about RAM.


    0
    sudo dmidecode --type 17
    FadeMind · 2013-04-18 20:13:07 0
  • Check SATA controller type. 6.0 Gbps - SATA III 3.0 Gbps - SATA II 1.5 Gbps - SATA I Show Sample Output


    1
    dmesg | grep -i sata | grep 'link up'
    FadeMind · 2013-04-18 15:41:33 0
  • Replace default command in skype.desktop file.


    0
    sudo sed -i 's/Exec=skype %U/Exec=skype --disable-cleanlooks -style GTK %U/' /usr/share/applications/skype.desktop
    FadeMind · 2013-04-17 08:43:00 0
  • Install Ksuperkey one command in Kubuntu. You must manually add ksuperkey to autostart in System Settings KDE.


    0
    sudo apt-get install git gcc make libx11-dev libxtst-dev pkg-config -y && git clone https://github.com/hanschen/ksuperkey.git && cd ksuperkey && make && sudo mv ksuperkey /usr/bin/ksuperkey && cd ~ && rm -rf ksuperkey
    FadeMind · 2013-04-17 07:12:46 0

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list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Show changed files, ignoring permission, date and whitespace changes
Only shows files with actual changes to text (excluding whitespace). Useful if you've messed up permissions or transferred in files from windows or something like that, so that you can get a list of changed files, and clean up the rest.

burn initial session on a growable DVD using growisofs
replace "directory name to burn on DVD" with actual directory name that you want to copy on DVD

The fastest remote directory rsync over ssh archival I can muster (40MB/s over 1gb NICs)
This creates an archive that does the following: rsync:: (Everyone seems to like -z, but it is much slower for me) -a: archive mode - rescursive, preserves owner, preserves permissions, preserves modification times, preserves group, copies symlinks as symlinks, preserves device files. -H: preserves hard-links -A: preserves ACLs -X: preserves extended attributes -x: don't cross file-system boundaries -v: increase verbosity --numeric-ds: don't map uid/gid values by user/group name --delete: delete extraneous files from dest dirs (differential clean-up during sync) --progress: show progress during transfer ssh:: -T: turn off pseudo-tty to decrease cpu load on destination. -c arcfour: use the weakest but fastest SSH encryption. Must specify "Ciphers arcfour" in sshd_config on destination. -o Compression=no: Turn off SSH compression. -x: turn off X forwarding if it is on by default. Flip: rsync -aHAXxv --numeric-ids --delete --progress -e "ssh -T -c arcfour -o Compression=no -x" [source_dir] [dest_host:/dest_dir]

find files in a date range
Example above will recursively find files in current directory created/modified in 2010.

Find common groups between two users

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Rename files in batch

Find directories under home directory with 777 permissions, change to 755, and list them on console

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials


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