Commands tagged xml (28)

  • Diffs two xml files by formatting them first using xmllint and then invoking diff. Usage: diffxml XMLFile1 XMLFile2


    13
    diffxml() { diff -wb <(xmllint --format "$1") <(xmllint --format "$2"); }
    sharfah · 2011-10-06 07:36:13 1
  • This will indent the input to be more readable. Warnings and messages are not send to STDOUT so you can just use a pipe to create the formatted outputfile, like: tidy -i -xml in.xml > out.xml Show Sample Output


    8
    tidy -i -xml <inputfile>
    Testuser_01 · 2012-11-03 18:10:58 0
  • Limited, but useful construct to extract text embedded in XML tags. This will only work if bar is all on one line. If nobody posts an alternative for the multiline sed version, I'll figure it out later...


    4
    sed -n 's/.*<foo>\([^<]*\)<\/foo>.*/\1/p'
    recursiverse · 2009-07-23 07:59:30 0
  • poor man's xml parser :)


    4
    xml2 < file.xml | grep ^/path/to/element | cut -f2- -d=
    bandie91 · 2011-12-19 18:51:17 1
  • If everything validates, there's no output. Can be handy to run on a cron job set up to email output.


    2
    find -type f -name "*.xml" -exec xmllint --noout {} \;
    bradbeattie · 2011-01-25 18:26:57 0

  • 2
    echo '<foo><bar/></foo>' | xmllint --format -
    akavel · 2012-01-12 09:39:56 0
  • The difference between the original version provided and this one is that this one works rather than outputting a wget error


    2
    curl $1 | grep -E "http.*\.mp3" | sed "s/.*\(http.*\.mp3\).*/\1/" | xargs wget
    theodric · 2015-09-17 13:19:53 14
  • Like `tidy`, `xmllint` can be used to prettify XML files. The --nsclean option is also useful to remove redundant namespaces.


    1
    xmllint --format --xmlout --nsclean <file>
    seb1245 · 2012-11-27 06:13:23 0
  • Neither of the others worked for me. This does.


    1
    curl http://url/rss | grep -o '<enclosure url="[^"]*' | grep -o '[^"]*$' | xargs wget -c
    dakira · 2016-05-29 12:07:21 9
  • Formats the output from `ioreg` into XML, then parses the XML with `xmllint`'s xpath feature. Show Sample Output


    1
    ioreg -ad2 -c IOPlatformExpertDevice | xmllint --xpath '//key[.="IOPlatformUUID"]/following-sibling::*[1]/text()' -
    n8felton · 2018-08-18 21:19:47 14
  • Directly download all mp3 files of the desired podcast


    1
    curl http://radiofrance-podcast.net/podcast09/rss_14726.xml | grep -Eo "(http|https)://[a-zA-Z0-9./?=_%:-]*mp3" | sort -u | xargs wget
    pascalv · 2021-08-09 13:40:26 60
  • This one will work a little better, the regular expressions it is not 100% accurate for XML parsing but it will suffice any XML valid document for sure. Show Sample Output


    0
    grep -Eho '<[a-ZA-Z_][a-zA-Z0-9_-:]*' * | sort -u | cut -c2-
    inkel · 2009-08-05 21:54:29 0
  • Might be able to do it in less steps with xmlstarlet, although whether that would end up being shorter overall I don't know - xmlstarlet syntax confuses the heck out of me. Prompts for your password, or if you're a bit mental you can add your password into the command itself in the format "-u user:password". Show Sample Output


    0
    curl -u <username> http://app.boxee.tv/api/get_queue | xml2 | grep /boxeefeed/message/description | awk -F= '{print $2}'
    Strawp · 2010-01-20 16:17:19 4
  • Ever wanted to stream your favorite podcast across the network, well now you can. This command will parse the iTunes enabled podcast and stream the latest episode across the network through ssh encryption. Show Sample Output


    0
    curl -L -s `curl -s http://www.2600.com/oth-broadband.xml` | xmlstarlet sel -t -m "//enclosure[1]" -v "@url" -n | head -n 1` | ssh -t [user]@[host] "mpg123 -"
    denzuko · 2010-07-30 23:20:50 0
  • Gets the latest podcast show from from your favorite Podcast. Uses curl and xmlstarlet. Make sure you change out the items between brackets.


    0
    curl -L -s `curl -s [http://podcast.com/show.rss]` | xmlstarlet sel -t -m "//enclosure[1]" -v "@url" -n | head -n 1` | ssh -t [user]@[host] "mpg123 -"
    denzuko · 2010-07-31 00:17:47 0
  • this simply curls the feed and runs a xpath query on it ... Show Sample Output


    0
    atomtitles () { curl --silent $1 | xmlstarlet sel -N atom="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom" -t -m /atom:feed/atom:entry -v atom:title -n}
    Seebi · 2010-12-15 11:03:31 0
  • This function uses xmllint to evaluate xpaths. Usage: xpath /some/xpath XMLfile Show Sample Output


    0
    xpath () { xmllint --format --shell "$2" <<< "cat $1" | sed '/^\/ >/d' }
    sharfah · 2011-10-05 07:45:16 1
  • The XML document can be transformed to text, XML, HTML or anything else. The --stringparam option allows to set XSL variables externally.


    0
    xsltproc --stringparam name value <xsl_stylesheet> <xml_document>
    seb1245 · 2012-11-09 15:54:46 0
  • OpenDocument documents from OpenOffice.org,LibreOffice and other applications, are actually ZIP archives. Useful informations in these archives are in XML format. Here we like it or do not. Anyway, the XML files have the unfortunate tendency to not be indented, and for good reason: they consist of only one line! To solve the problem and to use a proper editor on the content, I proceed as follows. Required xmlindent You can also use : zip document.odt content.xml And it works with vi instead of nano !


    0
    unzip document.odt content.xml && xmlindent -w content.xml && nano content.xml
    arthurdent · 2012-12-01 17:05:28 0
  • set BLOCK to "title" or any other HTML / RSS / XML tag and curl URL to get everything in-between e.g. some text


    0
    curl ${URL} 2>/dev/null|grep "<${BLOCK}>"|sed -e "s/.*\<${BLOCK}\>\(.*\)\<\/${BLOCK}\>.*/\1/g"
    c3w · 2013-08-31 14:53:54 0
  • This script can be used to download enclosed files from a RSS feed. For example, it can be used to download mp3 files from a podcasts RSS feed. Show Sample Output


    0
    wget -q -O- http://example-podcast-feed.com/rss | grep -o "<enclosure[ -~][^>]*" | grep -o "http://[ -~][^\"]*" | xargs wget -c
    talha131 · 2013-09-24 12:38:08 14
  • Don't want to open up an editor just to view a bunch of XML files in an easy to read format? Now you can do it from the comfort of your own command line! :-) This creates a new function, xmlpager, which shows an XML file in its entirety, but with the actual content (non-tag text) highlighted. It does this by setting the foreground to color #4 (red) after every tag and resets it before the next tag. (Hint: try `tput bold` as an alternative). I use 'xmlindent' to neatly reflow and indent the text, but, of course, that's optional. If you don't have xmlindent, just replace it with 'cat'. Additionally, this example shows piping into the optional 'less' pager; note the -r option which allows raw escape codes to be passed to the terminal. Show Sample Output


    0
    xmlpager() { xmlindent "$@" | awk '{gsub(">",">'`tput setf 4`'"); gsub("<","'`tput sgr0`'<"); print;} END {print "'`tput sgr0`'"}' | less -r; }
    hackerb9 · 2015-07-12 09:22:10 0
  • Just added a little url encoding with sed - urls with spaces don't work well - this also works against instead of enclosure and adds a sample to show that you can filter against links at a certain domain Show Sample Output


    0
    wget -q -O- http://www.yourfeed.com/rss | grep -o "<link[ -~][^>]*" | grep -o "http://www.myfeed.com[ -~][^\"]*" | sed "s: :%20:g" | xargs wget -c
    dermidgen · 2015-10-30 22:13:43 14

  • 0
    wget `curl -s <podcast feed URL> | grep -o 'https*://[^"]*mp3' | head -1`
    tbon3r · 2017-07-16 23:02:03 8
  • For debian likes, that's in python-xml package.


    -1
    xmlproc_parse.python-xml &>/dev/null <FILE> || exit 1
    sputnick · 2009-12-11 17:30:03 1
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Selecting a random file/folder of a folder
Also looks in subfolders

Kill all processes that don't belong to root/force logoff
explanation: grep -- displays process ids -v -- negates the matching, displays all but what is specified in the other options -u -- specifies the user to display, or in this case negate The process loops through all PIDs that are found by pgrep, then orders a forced kill to the processes in numerical order, effectively killing the parent processes first including the shells in use which will force the users to logout. Tested on Slackware Linux 12.2 and Slackware-current

Create a transition between two videos
We take the first 50 frames of a.mp4 for track a, and 24 blank frames followed by b.mp4 for track b. We then create a transition from track a to track b starting from frame 25 and ending at frame 49. The output is stored in out.mp4 To view the results without saving remove "-consumer avformat:out.mp4" from the end. Documentation of the mlt framework and the melt command can be found here: http://www.mltframework.org/bin/view/MLT/Documentation

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

List all information about all files (in current dir)
This is a funny usage of the traditional command ls. It could be basically simplified as: $ ls -a -l Duplicating arguments is permitted: $ ls -a -l -l And this markup could be shortened as: $ ls -al Extra note: To view filesizes like a pro, pray for your God: $ ls -allah

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Numeric zero padding file rename
rename file name with fixed length nomeric format pattern

Skip to next selection in playlist
Uses process signal to play next selection

Are the two lines anagrams?
This works by reading in two lines of input, turning each into a list of one-character matches that are sorted and compared.

Makes the permissions of file2 the same as file1
Also works with: $chgrp --reference file1 file2 $chown --reference file1 file2


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