Commands tagged podcast (7)


  • 0
    wget `curl -s <podcast feed URL> | grep -o 'https*://[^"]*mp3' | head -1`
    tbon3r · 2017-07-16 23:02:03 0
  • Neither of the others worked for me. This does.


    1
    curl http://url/rss | grep -o '<enclosure url="[^"]*' | grep -o '[^"]*$' | xargs wget -c
    dakira · 2016-05-29 12:07:21 0
  • Quick way to get the URL of the most recent audio file out of a podcast xml feed without any fancy xml parsing tools. Just curl, grep and head


    0
    mpc add `curl -s http://link.to/podcast/feed.xml | grep -o 'https*://[^"]*mp3' | head -1`
    tbon3r · 2015-10-11 09:17:35 0
  • The difference between the original version provided and this one is that this one works rather than outputting a wget error


    3
    curl $1 | grep -E "http.*\.mp3" | sed "s/.*\(http.*\.mp3\).*/\1/" | xargs wget
    theodric · 2015-09-17 13:19:53 1
  • This script can be used to download enclosed files from a RSS feed. For example, it can be used to download mp3 files from a podcasts RSS feed. Show Sample Output


    0
    wget -q -O- http://example-podcast-feed.com/rss | grep -o "<enclosure[ -~][^>]*" | grep -o "http://[ -~][^\"]*" | xargs wget -c
    talha131 · 2013-09-24 12:38:08 0
  • Gets the latest podcast show from from your favorite Podcast. Uses curl and xmlstarlet. Make sure you change out the items between brackets.


    0
    curl -L -s `curl -s [http://podcast.com/show.rss]` | xmlstarlet sel -t -m "//enclosure[1]" -v "@url" -n | head -n 1` | ssh -t [user]@[host] "mpg123 -"
    denzuko · 2010-07-31 00:17:47 0
  • Ever wanted to stream your favorite podcast across the network, well now you can. This command will parse the iTunes enabled podcast and stream the latest episode across the network through ssh encryption. Show Sample Output


    0
    curl -L -s `curl -s http://www.2600.com/oth-broadband.xml` | xmlstarlet sel -t -m "//enclosure[1]" -v "@url" -n | head -n 1` | ssh -t [user]@[host] "mpg123 -"
    denzuko · 2010-07-30 23:20:50 0

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Create a single-use TCP proxy with debug output to stderr
or you can add "-x" to get a typical hexdump like output

display a smiling smiley if the command succeeded and a sad smiley if the command failed
you could save the code between if and fi to a shell script named smiley.sh with the first argument as and then do a smiley.sh to see if the command succeeded. a bit needless but who cares ;)

continuously print string as if being entered from the keyboard
Cycles continuously through a string printing each character with a random delay less than 1 second. First parameter is min, 2nd is max. Example: 1 3 means sleep random .1 to .3. Experiment with different values. The 3rd parameter is the string. The sleep will help with battery life/power consumption. $ cycle 1 3 $(openssl rand 100 | xxd -p) Fans of "The Shining" might get a kick out of this: $ cycle 1 4 ' All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.'

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Follow tail by name (fix for rolling logs with tail -f)
If you use 'tail -f foo.txt' and it becomes temporarily moved/deleted (ie: log rolls over) then tail will not pick up on the new foo.txt and simply waits with no output. 'tail -F' allows you to follow the file by it's name, rather than a descriptor. If foo.txt disappears, tail will wait until the filename appears again and then continues tailing.

List the Sizes of Folders and Directories
I wanted an easy way to list out the sizes of directories and all of the contents of those directories recursively.

A random password generator

a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.

Display IP adress of the given interface in a most portable and reliable way. That should works on many platforms.
Thanks to comment if that works or not... If you have already typed that snippet or you know you already have IO::Interface::Simple perl module, you can type only the last command : $ perl -e 'use IO::Interface::Simple; my $ip=IO::Interface::Simple->new($ARGV[0]); print $ip->address,$/;' ( The first perl command will install the module if it's not there already... )


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