Commands by denzuko (7)

  • Gets the latest podcast show from from your favorite Podcast. Uses curl and xmlstarlet. Make sure you change out the items between brackets.


    0
    curl -L -s `curl -s [http://podcast.com/show.rss]` | xmlstarlet sel -t -m "//enclosure[1]" -v "@url" -n | head -n 1` | ssh -t [user]@[host] "mpg123 -"
    denzuko · 2010-07-31 00:17:47 0
  • Ever wanted to stream your favorite podcast across the network, well now you can. This command will parse the iTunes enabled podcast and stream the latest episode across the network through ssh encryption. Show Sample Output


    0
    curl -L -s `curl -s http://www.2600.com/oth-broadband.xml` | xmlstarlet sel -t -m "//enclosure[1]" -v "@url" -n | head -n 1` | ssh -t [user]@[host] "mpg123 -"
    denzuko · 2010-07-30 23:20:50 0
  • Stream OGG vorbis over ssh.


    2
    ssh [user]@[host] "ogg123 -" < [podcast].ogg
    denzuko · 2010-07-30 22:10:22 0
  • From time to time one forgets either thier gpg key or other passphrases. This can be very problematic in most cases. But luckily there's this script. Its based off of pwsafe which is a unix commandline program that manages encrypted password databases. For more info on pwsafe visit, http://nsd.dyndns.org/pwsafe/. What this script does is it will help you store all your passphrases for later on and allow you to copy it to your clipboard so you can just paste it in, all with one password. Pretty neat no? You can find future releases of this and many more scripts at The Teachings of Master Denzuko - denzuko.wordpress.com. Show Sample Output


    0
    pwsafe -qa "gpg keys"."$(finger `whoami` | grep Name | awk '{ print $4" "$5 }')"
    denzuko · 2009-05-07 14:49:56 0
  • While I love gpg and truecrypt there's some times when you just want to edit a file and not worry about keys or having to deal needing extra software on hand. Thus, you can use vim's encrypted file format. For more info on vim's encrypted files visit: http://www.vim.org/htmldoc/editing.html#encryption Show Sample Output


    84
    vim -x <FILENAME>
    denzuko · 2009-05-05 23:24:17 6
  • This is the alias command that I discussed in my prior release which you can add to your ~/.bashrc. This command asks for the station name and then connects to somafm, Great for those who have linux home entertainment boxes and ssh enabled on them, just for the CLI fiends out there ( I know I'm one of them ;) You can find future releases of this and many more scripts at the teachings of master denzuko - denzuko.co.cc.


    -2
    alias somafm='read -p "Which station? "; mplayer --reallyquiet -vo none -ao sdl http://somafm.com/startstream=${REPLY}.pls'
    denzuko · 2009-05-05 12:13:46 0
  • This command asks for the station name and then connects to somafm, Great for those who have linux home entertainment boxes and ssh enabled on them, just for the CLI fiends out there ( I know I'm one of them ;) Also, don't forget to add this as alias(ie alias somafm="read -p 'Which Station? "; mplayer --reallyquite -vo none -ao sdl


    11
    read -p "Which station? "; mplayer --reallyquiet -vo none -ao sdl http://somafm.com/startstream=${REPLY}.pls
    denzuko · 2009-05-04 00:26:19 8

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find . -name

Tells the shell you are using

analyze traffic remotely over ssh w/ wireshark
Please check out my blog article on this for more detail. http://jdubb.net/blog/2009/08/07/monitor-wireshark-capture-real-time-on-remote-host-via-ssh/

Show highlighted text with full terminal width
Show a full terminal line inverted with custom text.

kill some process (same as others) but parsing to a variable
Kills a process matching program. I suggest using $ pgrep -fl program to avoid over-killings Nice the following: kills all bash process owned by guest $ pkill -9 -f bash -u guest

Using ASCII Art output on MPlayer
Not so useful. Just a cool feature.

ttyS0 - terminal on serial connection
I actually planned to do this for quite a long time, but since I haven't had any suitable client hardware, I procrastinated this. Now, the old laptop I've got from my dad, features an RS-232 port. So, now that I had technically a client, that I could test my RS-232 connection with, I ordered a null modem cable. There is no RS-232 outlet on my desktop computer directly on the mainboard, but theres a connector on the mainbord, where a RS-232 outlet can be attached to. The outlet will then cover up a PCI slot. # Activating RS-232 Ok, once all cables were in place, I tried to access both RS-232 ports by reading from them directly. They're usually ttyS0 or ttyS1, depending what COM-Port it is. From the file /proc/tty/driver/serial, information about the serial setup can be obtained. A setserial -q /dev/ttyS0 might be usefull as well. Usually, the UART Type is 16550A, on a standard PC. Mine wasn't working though. At leas not right from the start, when I tried to read the interface with cat /dev/ttyS0 I got the following error: # cat /dev/ttyS0 cat: /dev/ttyS0: Input/output error Obviously, the driver couldn't activate the hardware. Reason was, it was deactivated in BIOS. After activating RS-232 there, it worked well. As a last action, I added myself to the uucp group, so I have user permission to the serial lines. It is not necessary for the terminal setup, but a good idea to do so, just for future projects, maybe... # Setting up a terminal Once the Serial line is configured and working properly, it's time to let a terminal run on that port. This is what I added to my /etc/inittab : s0:2345:respawn:/sbin/agetty -L 38400 ttyS0 I added it quite on the top of that file, right below the 'si' statement, mingetty cannot be used for serial connections, it cannot be run in a console, too. I tried it for testing purposes, but the cosole - along with your login program - will log you out, as soon as you log in over your serial line. '-L' means this is a local line, with no carrier signal. 38400 is the standard speed of a Linux console, it might be a bit high, I was told, but it works well. I tested that with some higher values as well (115200) and it worked too, I guess it tepends on things like cable length, etc. Last parameter, is the serial tty to listen on. The terminal type can be specified as an additional parameter at the end of the parameter list, vt102, for instance. This is sometimes required, depending on the client. After finishing editing /etc/inittab, an init q will make the system re-read /etc/inittab and apply changes. The agetty should now be listening on ttyS0. #Setting up a client It's time to establish a connection and test the serial line. I use a laptop, that has an RS-232 port, so some preliminary setup is required. I tried minicom as terminal initially, but it turned out, not to be the best client. It initializes the modem, this lasts quite long, and it doesn't convey ANSI colors. So the better option is cu, it's part of the UUCP-Package. Oh, and the serial port of that computer, has to be accessible as well, of course. Once everything was set up, I established the connection: $ cu -l ttyS0 -38400 --nostop Pretty self explanatory, I think. The --nostop option disables XON/XOFF handling. # root access over ttyS0 In order to become root over the serial terminal, the tty needs to be added to /etc/securetty I appended ttyS0 to the end of the file. It is now possible, to gain root access over the serial terminal. The agetty process needs to be restarted to apply changes. # Accessing GRUB over ttyS0 To make bootloader access possible over ttyS0, some changes to /boot/grub/menu.lst need to be done. (GRUB is the bootloader I use, I suppose LiLo has similar capabilities.) Those are the lines, I appended to the top of my menu.lst : serial --unit=0 --speed=38400 --word=8 --parity=no --stop=1 terminal --timeout=3 serial console The serial command initiates the serial terminal option, --unit=0 defines our first serial connector, I my case, it's the only one I have on my machine. I used the standard Linux-Console speed, as well as the "8N1" connection strategy. terminal defines the terminal priorities, first terminal (serial) is the standard one, the last one is the secondary terminal (console). --timeout=3 enables a delay on both consoles, with a prompt for a keystroke. Depending on which terminal, the key is pressed, this terminal, will be used. If no key is pressed after the timeout, the standard console (in my case serial) will be used. # Relaying Kernel output on boot The Kernel accepts multiple console options, of which the last one, is the standard console, and the one that will be used in Single User mode. These are my Kernel options: title Fedora Core (2.6.20-1.2316.fc5) root (hd0,0) kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.20-1.2316.fc5 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgb quiet vga=795 console=tty0 console=ttyS0,38400 initrd /initrd-2.6.20-1.2316.fc5.img console=tty0 is the standard console, located on the machine, i.e. monitor and keyboard.

Schedule a script or command in x num hours, silently run in the background even if logged out
doesn't require "at", change the "2h" to whatever you want... (deafult unit for sleep is seconds)

Insert the last argument of the previous command
for example if you did a: $ ls -la /bin/ls then $ ls !$ is equivalent to doing a $ ls /bin/ls

ptree equivalent in HP-UX
By setting the UNIX95 variable in HP-UX the XPG4 mode is activated, you get new options for ps and other commands, for me the best way to use this is to create an alias named ptree in root profile: alias ptree='UNIX95=1 ps -eH'


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