Commands tagged uuid (11)

  • Shows the UUID of the given partition (here /dev/sda7). Doesn't need to be root. Show Sample Output


    9
    blkid /dev/sda7
    lineak · 2010-09-05 12:20:45 1
  • Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.


    4
    lsblk -o NAME,TYPE,FSTYPE,LABEL,SIZE,MODEL,MOUNTPOINT
    BasketCase · 2012-09-12 15:30:25 0
  • `blkid` is an interface to libuuid - it can read Device Mapper, EVMS, LVM, MD, and regular block devices. -c /dev/null - Do not use cached output from /etc/blkid.tab or /etc/blkid/blkid.tab (RHEL) -i - Display I/O Limits (aka I/O topology) information (not available in RHEL) -p - Low-level superblock probing mode (not available in RHEL) Show Sample Output


    2
    blkid -c /dev/null
    mhs · 2012-09-12 13:34:41 2
  • Show the UUID-based alternate device names of ZEVO-related partitions on Darwin/OS X. Adapted from the lines by dbrady at http://zevo.getgreenbytes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=700#p700 and following the disk device naming scheme at http://zevo.getgreenbytes.com/wiki/pmwiki.php?n=Site.DiskDeviceNames Show Sample Output


    1
    ls /dev/disk* | xargs -n 1 -t sudo zdb -l | grep GPTE_
    grahamperrin · 2012-10-06 20:19:45 0
  • Formats the output from `ioreg` into XML, then parses the XML with `xmllint`'s xpath feature. Show Sample Output


    1
    ioreg -ad2 -c IOPlatformExpertDevice | xmllint --xpath '//key[.="IOPlatformUUID"]/following-sibling::*[1]/text()' -
    n8felton · 2018-08-18 21:19:47 22
  • first off, if you just want a random UUID, here's the actual command to use: uuidgen Your chances of finding a duplicate after running this nonstop for a year are about the same as being hit by a meteorite before finishing this sentence The reason for the command I have is that it's more provably unique than the one that uuidgen creates. uuidgen creates a random one by default, or an unencrypted one based on time and network address if you give it the -t option. Mine uses the mac address of the ethernet interface, the process id of the caller, and the system time down to nanosecond resolution, which is provably unique over all computers past, present, and future, subject to collisions in the cryptographic hash used, and the uniqueness of your mac address. Warning: feel free to experiment, but be warned that the stdin of the hash is binary data at that point, which may mess up your terminal if you don't pipe it into something. If it does mess up though, just type reset Show Sample Output


    0
    printf $(( echo "obase=16;$(echo $$$(date +%s%N))"|bc; ip link show|sed -n '/eth/ {N; p}'|grep -o -E '([[:xdigit:]]{1,2}:){5}[[:xdigit:]]{1,2}'|head -c 17 )|tr -d [:space:][:punct:] |sed 's/[[:xdigit:]]\{2\}/\\x&/g')|sha1sum|head -c 32; echo
    camocrazed · 2010-07-14 14:04:53 3

  • 0
    TEST_UUID=$(blkid /dev/sda6 | sed -rn "s/^.*UUID=\"([a-z0-9]{8}-[a-z0-9]{4}-[a-z0-9]{4}-[a-z0-9]{4}-[a-z0-9]{12})\".*/\1/p")
    Scraelos · 2011-09-05 09:38:19 0
  • Remove the dashes from a UUID using bash search and replace. Show Sample Output


    0
    UUID="63b726a0-4c59-45e4-af65-bced5d268456"; echo ${UUID//-/}
    flatcap · 2011-11-22 22:49:30 67
  • piped this to pbcopy (OSX only) you got a uuid in the pasteboard Show Sample Output


    0
    echo "import uuid\nimport sys\nsys.stdout.write(str(uuid.uuid4()))" | python
    tippy · 2014-07-23 07:43:01 3
  • Gets the Hardware UUID of the current machine using system_profiler. Show Sample Output


    0
    system_profiler SPHardwareDataType | awk '/UUID/ { print $3; }'
    thealanberman · 2014-07-25 06:54:40 1

  • 0
    ioreg -d2 -c IOPlatformExpertDevice | awk -F\" '/IOPlatformUUID/{print $(NF-1)}'
    n8felton · 2018-08-18 21:18:20 3

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convert binary data to shellcode

Edit file(s) that has been just listed
That will open vi with the four README files in different viewports. Specially handy when you find there is only one file matching your pattern and you don't want to specify the full path.

Getting Screen's Copy Buffer Into X's Copy Buffer (on Linux)
This command will let you just type c-a b (which means press 'ctrl' then 'a' then 'b'), and screen will save your copy buffer to /tmp/screen-exchange, and then execute xsel to copy the contents of that file into the system's X clipboard. 1. Install Conrad Parker's xsel from http://www.vergenet.net/~conrad/software/xsel/ 2. Add these lines to your .screenrc # Add cool line to make copying to x clipboard possible. # This binds C-a b to copy screen's copy buffer to the system clipboard. bind b eval writebuf 'exec /bin/sh -c "xsel -i -b < /tmp/screen-exchange"' 'exec /bin/sh -c "killall xsel"' 3. Restart screen. 4. Test it by typing c-a [ to enter copy mode. 5. Select some text using vi movement keys (h, j, k, l, etc...) and starting your selection by hitting the space bar, moving with vi movement keys, and then ending your selection with the space bar. 6. Type C-a b, and screen will use xsel to copy your screen copy buffer to the system's X clipboard buffer. 7. Then you can paste the screen copy buffer into any X program. Note: If you're using Mac OSX, you can use pbcopy instead of xsel. Also Note: The second exec in the .screenrc file, which runs killall on xsel, is necessary, because even when you redirect a file to xsel, xsel waits for you to press ctrl-c to kill it, and have it stop waiting for more input. Since xsel forces screen to wait, and I don't want to press ctrl-c, I send the equivalent of ctrl-c with killall causing xsel to write /tmp/screen-exchange to the X clipboard, and then exit. It's a hack, but it works. If you know how to get this to work without a lame hack leave a comment explaining how.

Remove Thumbs.db files from folders
An alternative which uses the advanced zsh globbing (pattern matching)

Switch to a user with "nologin" shell
You need sudo privileges for this command. Replace username with actual username.

Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Monitor memory without top or htop
It repeats a command, such as free, every five seconds and highlights the differences

Show your current network interface in use

Generate map of your hardware


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