Commands by grahamperrin (2)


  • -1
    diskutil list
    grahamperrin · 2012-10-06 21:18:27 2
  • Show the UUID-based alternate device names of ZEVO-related partitions on Darwin/OS X. Adapted from the lines by dbrady at http://zevo.getgreenbytes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=700#p700 and following the disk device naming scheme at http://zevo.getgreenbytes.com/wiki/pmwiki.php?n=Site.DiskDeviceNames Show Sample Output


    1
    ls /dev/disk* | xargs -n 1 -t sudo zdb -l | grep GPTE_
    grahamperrin · 2012-10-06 20:19:45 3

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Alias for lazy tmux create/reattach

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