Commands tagged os (1)

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list files recursively by size

Find the package that installed a command

identify exported sonames in a path
This provides a list of shared object names (sonames) that are exported by a given tree. This is usually useful to make sure that a given required dependency (NEEDED entry) is present in a firmware image tree. The shorter (usable) version for it would be $ scanelf -RBSq -F "+S#f" But I used the verbose parameters in the command above, for explanation.

Drop all tables from a database, without deleting it
Uses two comands, requieres mysqldump, but works as expected.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

tar a directory and send it to netcat
tar's directory and sends to netcat listening on port 10000 On the client end: netcat [server ip] 10000 | tar xfvz - This will send it over the network and extract it on the clients machine.

Mount a windows partition in a dual boot linux installation with write permission...[Read and Write]
If you have the library installed ntfs-3g, you will be able to mount the windows partition and write on it....

Find files and calculate size of result in shell
Use find's internal stat to get the file size then let the shell add up the numbers.

Create a new file

Create a bash script from last commands
In order to write bash-scripts, I often do the task manually to see how it works. I type ### at the start of my session. The function fetches the commands from the last occurrence of '###', excluding the function call. You could prefix this with a here-document to have a proper script-header. Delete some lines, add a few variables and a loop, and you're ready to go. This function could probably be much shorter...


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