Commands using get (11)

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Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs (inspired from the work of the user justsomeguy)
Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale.

Unlock VMs in Proxmox
Unlock your VMS to avoid problems after some failed tasks ended.

strip config files of comments
some configuration files, particularly those installed by default as part of a package, have tons of comment lines, to help you know what's possible to configure, and what it means. That's nice, but sometimes you just want to see what specifically what _has_ been configured. That's when I use the above snippet, which I save as a bash alias 'nocom' (for 'no comments'). Apache default config files are perfect examples of when/why this script is handy.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

April Fools' Day Prank
Add this to a fiend's .bashrc. PROMPT_COMMAND will run just before a prompt is drawn. RANDOM will be between 0 and 32768; in this case, it'll run about 1/10th of the time. \033 is the escape character. I'll call it \e for short. \e7 -- save cursor position. \e[%d;%dH -- move cursor to absolute position \e[4%dm \e[m -- draw a random color at that point \e8 -- restore position.

Random unsigned integer
Reads 4 bytes from the random device and formats them as unsigned integer between 0 and 2^32-1.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Rsync remote data as root using sudo
If your user has sudo on the remote box, you can rsync data as root without needing to login as root. This is very helpful if the remote box does not allow root to login over SSH (which is a common security restriction).

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Monitor progress of a command
Pipe viewer is a terminal-based tool for monitoring the progress of data through a pipeline. It can be inserted into any normal pipeline between two processes to give a visual indication of how quickly data is passing through, how long it has taken, how near to completion it is, and an estimate of how long it will be until completion. Source: http://www.catonmat.net/blog/unix-utilities-pipe-viewer/


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