Commands by bartonski (45)

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Viewable terminal session over network.
connect to it with any network command (including web browser - if you don't mind weird formatting) curl 127.0.0.1:9876 nc 127.0.0.1 9876

Quick directory bookmarks
Set a bookmark as normal shell variable $ p=/cumbersome/path/to/project To go there $ to p This saves one "$" and is faster to type ;-) The variable is still useful as such: $ vim $p/ will expand the variable (at least in bash) and show a list of files to edit. If setting the bookmarks is too much typing you could add another function $ bm() { eval $1=$(pwd); } then bookmark the current directory with $ bm p

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Broadcast your shell thru ports 5000, 5001, 5002 ...
run 'nc yourip 5000', 'nc yourip 5001' or 'nc yourip 5002' elsewhere will produce an exact same mirror of your shell. This is handy when you want to show someone else some amazing stuff in your shell without giving them control over it.

Leap year calculation

umount --rbind mount with submounts
Original: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=194342

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Symlink all files from a base directory to a target directory
Symlinks all files in the base directory to the target directory then lists all of the created symlinks.

Remove executable bit from all files in the current directory recursively, excluding other directories
Useful if you have copied files from an OS without a permission structure (for example, DOS) and you need to disable all executable files but want to be able to descend into your directories.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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