Commands by zzambia (2)

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Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Turning off display
To turn off monitor: xset dpms force off To turn on, simply press a key, or move mouse/mousepad.

Get mouse location (X,Y coordinates)

list files recursively by size

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Get names of files in /dev, a USB device is attached to
This command lists the names of your USB devices connected and what file in /dev they are using. It's pretty useful if you don't have an automount option in your desktop or you don't have any graphical enviroment.

add lyrics

Displays the current time using HTTP
This command will show the current GMT time using HTTP. This might be useful if you just want to know what's the current human-readable and accurate-enough time, without changing the system time, using a simple command that would work regardless of the availability of NTP. Note: To get a quicker and more accurate response, replace google.com with your local NTP server. Also can be used as an alternative to the "htpdate" program: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/668/set-your-computers-clock-using-http-and-htp-http-time-protocol-when-ntpsntp-is-not-available

start a tunnel from some machine's port 80 to your local post 2001
now you can acces the website by going to http://localhost:2001/

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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