Commands by jbcurtis (2)

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Burn an ISO on the command line.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Get yesterday's date or a previous time
With this command you can get a previous or future date or time. Where can you use this? How about finding all files modified or created in the last 5 mins? touch -t `echo $(date -d "5 minute ago" "+%G%m%d%H%M.%S")` me && find . -type f -newer me List all directories created since last week? touch -t `echo $(date -d "1 week ago" "+%G%m%d%H%M.%S")` me && find . -type d -cnewer me I'm sure you can think of more ways to use it. Requires coreutils package.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Edit a file on a remote host using vim

Expand shortened URLs
This relies on a public API from http://longurl.org. So, this has the weakness that if the service disappears, the function will break. However, it has the advantage that the shortened URL service will not be tracking your IP address and other metrics, but instead will track longurl.org. Thus, you can remain anonymous from the shortened URL services (although not anonymous from longurl.org). It does no sanity checking that you have provided an argument. If you do not provide one, "message" is displayed to STDOUT.

generate iso

Stripping ^M at end of each line for files
That "^M" is Ctrl-M, which is a carriage return, and is not needed in Unix file systems. Where ^V is actually Ctrl-V and ^M is actually Ctrl-M (you must type these yourself, don't just copy and paste this command). ^V will not be displayed on your screen.

Reconnect to screen without disconnecting other sessions
Have your screen session running in multiple places. (warning, things start to look weird if the terminal windows have different dimensions)

Monitor memory usage
Monitor with watch command and vmstat, memory usage


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