Commands by salamando (2)

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A function to output a man page as a pdf file
Tested on Fedora 12. This function will take a man page and convert it to pdf, saving the output to the current working directory. In Gnome, you can then view the output with "gnome-open file.pdf", or your favorite pdf viewer.

sort lines by length
making it "sound" more "natural" language like -- additionally sorting the longest words alphabetically: this approach is using: * to get at all lines of input * post-"for" structure * short-circuit-or in sort: if the lengths are the same, then sort alphabetically otherwise don't even evaluate the right hand side of the or * -C sets all input and ouput channels to utf8

switch case of a text file

Capture video of a linux desktop
Proper screencast with audio using ffmpeg and x264, as per http://verb3k.wordpress.com/2010/01/26/how-to-do-proper-screencasts-on-linux/

Print a row of 50 hyphens
Get there by going backwards and forgetting the numbers.

Testing hard disk writing speed

Find name of package which installed a given shell command
Some command names are very different from the name of the package that installed them. Sometimes, you may want to find out the name of the package that provided a command on a system, so that you can install it on another system.

Manipulate the metadata when the photo was taken, this will shift with +15hours + 30min

Factory reset your harddrive. (BE CAREFUL!)

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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