Press ctrl+r in a bash shell and type a few letters of a previous command

^r in bash begins a reverse-search-history with command completion
In the sample output, I pressed ctrl+r and typed the letters las. I can't imagine how much typing this has saved me.
Sample Output
(reverse-i-search)`las': last -a | head

15
By: abcde
2009-02-19 18:17:54

These Might Interest You

  • Very handy and time-saving. Do a 'ctrl+ r' on command prompt. You will see a "(reverse-i-search)`':" mark. Just type any sub-string of the command you want to search(provided you have used it sometime in the same session). Keep on searching by repeatedly pressing ctrl+r. Press enter once you get the desired command string. Show Sample Output


    9
    ctrl + r
    Bluehive · 2009-06-25 06:51:38 4
  • This command will play back each keystroke in a session log recorded using the script command. You'll need to replace the ^[ ^G and ^M characters with CTRL-[, CTRL-G and CTRL-M. To do this you need to press CTRL-V CTRL-[ or CTRL-V CTRL-G or CTRL-V CTRL-M. You can adjust the playback typing speed by modifying the sleep. If you're not bothered about seeing each keypress then you could just use: cat session.log Show Sample Output


    0
    (IFS=; sed 's/^[]0;[^^G]*^G/^M/g' <SessionLog> | while read -n 1 ITEM; do [ "$ITEM" = "^M" ] && ITEM=$'\n'; echo -ne "$ITEM"; sleep 0.05; done; echo)
    jgc · 2010-01-20 16:11:32 2
  • For those who like to hit instead of typing "exit" to leave the shell and find it annoying that it doesn't work in Midnight Commander, just press to switch to the subshell and now you can leave with


    1
    <ctrl+o><ctrl+d>
    adeverteuil · 2015-08-19 20:57:09 4
  • Next time you are using your shell, try typing ctrl-x e (that is holding control key press x and then e). The shell will take what you've written on the command line thus far and paste it into the editor specified by $EDITOR. Then you can edit at leisure using all the powerful macros and commands of vi, emacs, nano, or whatever. Show Sample Output


    489
    ctrl-x e
    fool · 2009-03-11 09:26:05 14

What Others Think

Keep pressing ^r to continue pattern matching backwards through your history.
atoponce · 483 weeks and 1 day ago
And ^s to go forward in history.
Ammar · 408 weeks and 5 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

You must be signed in to comment.

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands



Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: