Commands by jgc (13)

  • Print a row of characters across the terminal. Uses tput to establish the current terminal width, and generates a line of characters just long enough to cross it. In the example '#' is used. It's possible to use a repeating sequence by dividing the columns by the number of characters in the sequence like this: seq -s'~-' 0 $(( $(tput cols) /2 )) | tr -d '[:digit:]' or seq -s'-~?' 0 $(( $(tput cols) /3 )) | tr -d '[:digit:]' You will lose chararacters at the end if the length isn't cleanly divisible. Show Sample Output


    6
    seq -s'#' 0 $(tput cols) | tr -d '[:digit:]'
    jgc · 2010-04-01 09:06:44 0
  • This command will play back each keystroke in a session log recorded using the script command. You'll need to replace the ^[ ^G and ^M characters with CTRL-[, CTRL-G and CTRL-M. To do this you need to press CTRL-V CTRL-[ or CTRL-V CTRL-G or CTRL-V CTRL-M. You can adjust the playback typing speed by modifying the sleep. If you're not bothered about seeing each keypress then you could just use: cat session.log Show Sample Output


    0
    (IFS=; sed 's/^[]0;[^^G]*^G/^M/g' <SessionLog> | while read -n 1 ITEM; do [ "$ITEM" = "^M" ] && ITEM=$'\n'; echo -ne "$ITEM"; sleep 0.05; done; echo)
    jgc · 2010-01-20 16:11:32 2
  • Print out contents of file with line numbers. This version will print a number for every line, and separates the numbering from the line with a tab. Show Sample Output


    -1
    sed = <file> | sed 'N;s/\n/\t/'
    jgc · 2009-12-11 14:39:14 0
  • The -i option in sed allows in-place editing of the input file. Replace myexpression with any regular expression. /expr/d syntax means if the expression matches then delete the line. You can reverse the functionality to keep matching lines only by using: sed -i -n '/myexpression/p' /path/to/file.txt


    11
    sed -i '/myexpression/d' /path/to/file.txt
    jgc · 2009-11-09 11:40:45 2
  • Alternative command to retrieve the CPU model name and strip off the "model name : " labels. Show Sample Output


    0
    sed -n 's/^model name[ \t]*: *//p' /proc/cpuinfo
    jgc · 2009-11-05 10:59:31 1
  • This command uses the top voted "Get your external IP" command from commandlinefu.com to get your external IP address. Use this and you will always be using the communities favourite command. This is a tongue-in-cheek entry and not recommended for actual usage.


    -1
    eval $(curl -s http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/matching/external/ZXh0ZXJuYWw=/sort-by-votes/plaintext|sed -n '/^# Get your external IP address$/{n;p;q}')
    jgc · 2009-11-04 16:58:31 0
  • There's been so many ways submitted to get your external IP address that I decided we all need a command that will just go pick a random one from the list and run it. This gets a list of "Get your external IP" commands from commanlinefu.com and selects a random one to run. It will run the command and print out which command it used. This is not a serious entry, but it was a learning exercise for me writing it. My personal favourite is "curl icanhazip.com". I really don't think we need any other ways to do this, but if more come you can make use of them with this command ;o). Here's a more useful command that always gets the top voted "External IP" command, but it's not so much fun: eval $(curl -s http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/matching/external/ZXh0ZXJuYWw=/sort-by-votes/plaintext|sed -n '/^# Get your external IP address$/{n;p;q}') Show Sample Output


    3
    IFS=$'\n';cl=($(curl -s http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/matching/external/ZXh0ZXJuYWw=/sort-by-votes/plaintext|sed -n '/^# Get your external IP address$/{n;p}'));c=${cl[$(( $RANDOM % ${#cl[@]} ))]};eval $c;echo "Command used: $c"
    jgc · 2009-11-04 16:55:44 3
  • Another way of doing it that's a bit clearer. I'm a fan of readable code.


    7
    script_path=$(cd $(dirname $0);pwd)
    jgc · 2009-10-14 16:04:03 3
  • In this simple example the command will add a comma to the end of every line except the last. I found this really useful when programatically constructing sql scripts. See sample output for example. Show Sample Output


    5
    sed -e "$ ! s/$/,/"
    jgc · 2009-10-13 10:13:52 1
  • Makes use of $RANDOM environment variable.


    0
    head -c10 <(echo $RANDOM$RANDOM$RANDOM)
    jgc · 2009-10-09 15:09:02 2
  • Using the standard numeric comparison but suppressing the STDERR output acts as the simplest way to check a value is numeric. See sample output for some examples. Show Sample Output


    0
    if [ "$testnum" -eq "$testnum" 2>/dev/null ]; then echo It is numeric; fi
    jgc · 2009-10-09 14:57:27 4
  • Very useful for interactive scripts where you would like to return the terminal contents to its original state before the script was run. This would be similar to how vi exits and returns you to your original terminal screen. Save and clear the terminal contents with: tput smcup Execute some commands, then restore the saved terminal contents with: tput rmcup


    8
    tput smcup; echo "Doing some things..."; sleep 2; tput rmcup
    jgc · 2009-10-08 16:48:04 2
  • In this example the command "somecommand" will be executed and sent a SIGALARM signal if it runs for more than 10 seconds. It uses the perl alarm function. It's not 100% accurate on timing, but close enough. I found this really useful when executing scripts and commands that I knew might hang E.g. ones that connect to services that might not be running. Importantly this can be used within a sequential script. The command will not release control until either the command completes or the timeout is hit. Show Sample Output


    5
    perl -e "alarm 10; exec @ARGV" "somecommand"
    jgc · 2009-09-23 12:03:55 4

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Check These Out

Extract title from HTML files
Case Insensitive! and Works even if the "<title>...</title>" spans over multiple line. Simple! :-)

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Bash Dialog
The dialog utility is used to create a basic level graphical user interface. We can use this in Shell script to create very useful programs.

Show git branches by date - useful for showing active branches
This fixes a bug found in the other scripts which fail when a branch has the same name as a file or directory in the current directory.

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Repeat a portrait eight times so it can be cut out from a 6"x4" photo and used for visa or passport photos
Yes, You could do it in the GIMP or even use Inkscape to auto-align the clones, but the command line is so much easier. NOTE: The +clone and -clone options are just to shorten the command line instead of typing the same filename eight times. It might also speed up the montage by only processing the image once, but I'm not sure. "+clone" duplicates the previous image, the following two "-clone"s duplicate the first two and then the first four images. NOTE2: The -frame option is just so that I have some lines to cut along. BUG: I haven't bothered to calculate the exact geometry (width and height) of each image since that was not critical for the visa photos I need. If it matters for you, it should be easy enough to set using the -geometry flag near the end of the command. For example, if you have your DPI set to 600, you could use "-geometry 800x1200!" to make each subimage 1⅓ x 2 inches. You may want to use ImageMagick's "-density 600" option to put a flag in the JPEG file cuing the printer that it is a 600 DPI image. BUG2: ImageMagick does not autorotate images based on the EXIF information. Since the portrait photo was taken with the camera sideways, I made the JPEG rotate using jhead like so: jhead -autorot 2007-08-25-3685.jpg

Factorial With Case
Computes factorials.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Test for Weak SSL Ciphers
...if you get a certificate back, the server is accepting weak SSL ciphers

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.


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