Commands tagged espeak (4)

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Numeric zero padding file rename
This uses Perl's rename utility (you may have to call it as prename on your box) and won't choke on spaces or other characters in filenames. It will also zero pad a number even in filenames like "vacation-4.jpg".

Double your disk read performance in a single command
(WARN) This will absolutely not work on all systems, unless you're running large, high speed, hardware RAID arrays. For example, systems using Dell PERC 5/i SAS/SATA arrays. If you have a hardware RAID array, try it. It certainly wont hurt. You may be can test the speed disk with some large file in your system, before and after using this: $ time dd if=/tmp/disk.iso of=/dev/null bs=256k To know the value of block device parameter known as readahead. $ blockdev --getra /dev/sdb And set the a value 1024, 2048, 4096, 8192, and maybe 16384... it really depends on the number of hard disks, their speed, your RAID controller, etc. (see sample)

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Enter your ssh password one last time
Enter your ssh public key in the remote end for future key-based authentication. Just type your password one last time. The next time you should be able to login with the public key. If you don't have a key, generate one with ssh-keygen. Requires Bourne-compatible shell in the remote end.

Display all shell functions set in the current shell environment
Uses the shell builtin `declare` with the '-f' flag to output only functions to grep out only the function names. You can use it as an alias or function like so: alias shfunctions="builtin declare -f | command grep --color=never -E '^[a-zA-Z_]+\ \(\)'" shfunctions () { builtin declare -f | command grep --color=never -E '^[a-zA-Z_]+\ \(\)'; }

Set name of windows in tmux/byobu to hostnames of servers you're connected to
*I run this with byobu as as a custom status bar entry that runs every 10 seconds by putting it in a script here: $ .byobu/bin/10_update_windows There's no output to stdout, so nothing is displayed on the status bar. *Presumes that #{pane_title} is set to the hostname or prompt containing the host name. In my case, it's in this format: $ $USER@$HOSTNAME:$PWD The sed commands may need to be modified if your pane_title is different. *If you want to strip out a common part of a hostname, add the following before '| uniq' $ -e 's/[COMMON PART]//' I use that to strip out the domain of the servers I connect to, leaving the subdomain.

Delete a file/directory walking subdirectories (bash4 or zsh)

Clean up the garbage an accidental unzipping makes
List out all the names from the zip file and pass it to xargs utility to delete each one of them

ring the bell


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