Commands tagged espeak (4)

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Count the number of man pages per first character (a-z)
There once was a day I needed this info.

grep for minus (-) sign
Use flag "--" to stop switch parsing

perl insert character on the first line on your file

svn diff colorized
If colordiff utility installed, it is sometimes handy to call this command. Of course, you should create an alias for it. E.g. svndiff.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Redirect a filehandle from a currently running process.
This command uses the debugger to attach to a running process, and reassign a filehandle to a file. The two commands executed in gdb are p close(1) which closes STDOUT and p creat("/tmp/filename",0600) which creates a file and opens it for output. Since file handles are assigned sequentially, this command opens the file in place of STDOUT and once the process continues, new output to STDOUT will instead be written to our capture file.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Print only the odd lines of a file
NR%2 == 1 on odd lines and 0 on even lines

Add thousand separator with sed, in a file or within pipe
Does not necessarily require a file to process, it can be used in a pipe as well: $ cat filename | sed -e :a -e 's/\(.*[0-9]\)\([0-9]\{3\}\)/\1,\2/;ta' I don't remember where I copy/pasted this from, I wish I credited the original author

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested


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