Commands using gawk (36)

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Google verbatim search on your terminal
Put it in your ~/.bashrc usage: google word1 word2 word3... google '"this search gets quoted"'

kill a process(e.g. conky) by its name, useful when debugging conky:)

determine if tcp port is open
for udp nmap -sU -p 80 hostname

All what exists in dir B and not in dir A will be copied from dir B to new or existing dir C
Assumed dir A, B, C are subdirs of the current dir Exact syntax of the command is: rsync -v -r --size-only --compare-dest=/path_to_A/A/ /path_to_B/B/ /path_to_C/C/ (do not omit end-slashes, since that would copy only the names and not the contents of subdirs of dir B to dir C) You can replace --size-only with --checksum for more thorough file differences validation Useful switch: -n, --dry-run perform a trial run with no changes made

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

List all information about all files (in current dir)
This is a funny usage of the traditional command ls. It could be basically simplified as: $ ls -a -l Duplicating arguments is permitted: $ ls -a -l -l And this markup could be shortened as: $ ls -al Extra note: To view filesizes like a pro, pray for your God: $ ls -allah

remove files and directories with acces time older than a given date
touch a dummy file with the specified date, then use find with -anewer .

Search recursively to find a word or phrase in certain file types, such as C code
I have a bash alias for this command line and find it useful for searching C code for error messages. The -H tells grep to print the filename. you can omit the -i to match the case exactly or keep the -i for case-insensitive matching. This find command find all .c and .h files

Save the current directory without leaving it
Save the current directory without having to leave it. When you do decide to leave the current directory, use popd to return to it.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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