Commands tagged sparse (3)

  • This causes cp to detect and omit large blocks of nulls. Sparse files are useful for implying a lot of disk space without actually having to write it all out. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sparse_file You can use it in a pipe too: dd if=/dev/zero bs=1M count=5 |cp --sparse=always /dev/stdin SPARSE_FILE Show Sample Output


    4
    cp --sparse=always <SRC> <DST>
    h3xx · 2011-09-07 08:02:50 0
  • Prints the path/filename and sparseness of any sparse files (files that use less actual space than their total size because the filesystem treats large blocks of 00 bytes efficiently).


    2
    find -type f -printf "%S\t%p\n" 2>/dev/null | gawk '{if ($1 < 1.0) print $1 $2}'
    thetrivialstuff · 2011-07-02 19:22:49 1
  • Prints the path/filename and sparseness of any sparse files (files that use less actual space than their total size because the filesystem treats large blocks of 00 bytes efficiently). Uses a Tasker-esque field separator of more than one character to ensure uniqueness. Show Sample Output


    0
    find -type f -printf "%S=:=%p\n" 2>/dev/null | gawk -F'=:=' '{if ($1 < 1.0) print $1,$2}'
    TommyTwoPuds · 2019-02-06 14:12:32 0

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See why a program can't seem to access a file
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Display Spinner while waiting for some process to finish
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Replace Solaris vmstat numbers with human readable format
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Watch TCP, UDP open ports in real time with socket summary.

Video Google download
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