Commands tagged cp (27)

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Backup file, create dir and set perms in one shot
Prior to working on/modifying a file, use the 'install -m' command which can both copy files, create directories, and set their permissions at the same time. Useful when you are working in the public_html folder and need to keep the cp'd file hidden.

List all installed Debian packages
Should work on all systems that use dpkg and APT package management.

Put split files back together, without a for loop
After splitting a file, put them all back together a lot faster then doing $cat file1 file2 file3 file4 file5 > mainfile or $for i in {0..5}; do cat file$i > mainfile; done When splitting, be sure to do split -d for getting numbers instead of letters

Graph # of connections for each hosts.
Written for linux, the real example is how to produce ascii text graphs based on a numeric value (anything where uniq -c is useful is a good candidate).

Enter a command but keep it out of the history
Put a space in front of your command on the command line and it will not be logged as part of your command line history.

history manipulation
make make install !-2 && !-1

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

list files recursively by size

Resume scp of a big file
It can resume a failed secure copy ( usefull when you transfer big files like db dumps through vpn ) using rsync. It requires rsync installed in both hosts. rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh $file_source $user@$host:$destination_file local -> remote or rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh $user@$host:$remote_file $destination_file remote -> local


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