Commands by joeseggiola (2)

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In place line numbering
Add permanent line numbers to a file without creating a temp file. The rm command deletes file10 while the nl command works on the open file descriptor of file10 which it outputs into a new file again named file10. The new file10 will now be numbered in the same directory with the same file name and content as before, but it will in fact be a new file, using (ls -i) to show its inode number will prove this.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

C one-liners
$ /lib/ld-linux.so.2 is the runtime linker/loader for ELF binaries on Linux. =(cmd) is a zsh trick to take the output for the command "inside" it and save it to a temporary file. $ echo -e 'blah' | gcc -x c -o /dev/stdout - pipes the C source to gcc. -x c tells gcc that it's compiling C (which is required if it's reading from a pipe). -o /dev/stdout - tells it to write the binary to standard output and read the source from standard input. because of the the =() thing, the compiled output is stashed in a tempfile, which the loader then runs and executes, and the shell tosses the tempfile away immediately after running it.

urldecoding with one pure BASH builtin
You can use ordinary printf to convert "%23%21%2fbin%2fbash" into "#!/bin/bash" with no external utilities, by using a little known printf feature -- the "%b" specifier converts shell escapes. Replace % with \x and printf will understand the urlencoded string. BASH's printf has an extension to set a variable directly, too. So you get to convert urlencoded strings from garble to plaintext in one step with no externals and no backticks.

Short one line while loop that outputs parameterized content from one file to another
There is a common command for outputting a field or list of fields from each line in a file. Why wouldn't you just use cut?

Get first Git commit hash
git log --format=%H | tail -1 doesn't work anymore

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Display a list of committers sorted by the frequency of commits
Use this command to find out a list of committers sorted by the frequency of commits.

Remove ( color / special / escape / ANSI ) codes, from text, with sed
Remove ( color / special / escape / ANSI ) codes, from text, with sed Credit to the original folks who I've copied this command from. The diff here is: Theirs: [m|K] Theirs is supposed to remove \E[NUMBERS;NUMBERS[m OR K] This statement is incorrect in 2 ways. 1. The letters m and K are two of more than 20+ possible letters that can end these sequences. 2. Inside []'s , OR is already assumed, so they are also looking for sequences ending with | which is not correct. This : [a-zA-Z] This resolves the "OR" issue noted above, and takes care of all sequences, as they all end with a lower or upper cased letter. This ensures 100% of any escape code 'mess' is removed.

syncronizing datas beetween two folder (A and B) excluding some directories in A (dir1 and dir2)


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