Commands tagged nice (5)

  • We all know... nice -n19 for low CPU priority.   ionice -c3 for low I/O priority.   nocache can be useful in related scenarios, when we operate on very large files just a single time, e.g. a backup job. It advises the kernel that no caching is required for the involved files, so our current file cache is not erased, potentially decreasing performance on other, more typical file I/O, e.g. on a desktop.   http://askubuntu.com/questions/122857 https://github.com/Feh/nocache http://packages.debian.org/search?keywords=nocache http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?keywords=nocache   To undo caching of a single file in hindsight, you can do cachedel <OneSingleFile>   To check the cache status of a file, do cachestats <OneSingleFile>


    21
    nocache <I/O-heavy-command>
    michelsberg · 2013-05-21 15:15:05 3
  • I needed a way to search all files in a web directory that contained a certain string, and replace that string with another string. In the example, I am searching for "askapache" and replacing that string with "htaccess". I wanted this to happen as a cron job, and it was important that this happened as fast as possible while at the same time not hogging the CPU since the machine is a server. So this script uses the nice command to run the sh shell with the command, which makes the whole thing run with priority 19, meaning it won't hog CPU processing. And the -P5 option to the xargs command means it will run 5 separate grep and sed processes simultaneously, so this is much much faster than running a single grep or sed. You may want to do -P0 which is unlimited if you aren't worried about too many processes or if you don't have to deal with process killers in the bg. Also, the -m1 command to grep means stop grepping this file for matches after the first match, which also saves time. Show Sample Output


    10
    sh -c 'S=askapache R=htaccess; find . -mount -type f|xargs -P5 -iFF grep -l -m1 "$S" FF|xargs -P5 -iFF sed -i -e "s%${S}%${R}%g" FF'
    AskApache · 2009-10-02 05:03:10 0

  • 4
    renice +5 -p $(pidof <process name>)
    0x2142 · 2010-01-19 22:16:24 0

  • 3
    slow2() { ionice -c3 renice -n 20 $(pstree `pidof $1` -p -a -u -A|gawk 'BEGIN{FS=","}{print $2}'|cut -f1 -d " ") ; }
    oernii3 · 2010-11-18 10:50:17 0
  • Check out the usage of 'trap', you may not have seen this one much. This command provides a way to schedule commands at certain times by running them after sleep finishes sleeping. In the example 'sleep 2h' sleeps for 2 hours. What is cool about this command is that it uses the 'trap' builtin bash command to remove the SIGHUP trap that normally exits all processes started by the shell upon logout. The 'trap 1' command then restores the normal SIGHUP behaviour. It also uses the 'nice -n 19' command which causes the sleep process to be run with minimal CPU. Further, it runs all the commands within the 2nd parentheses in the background. This is sweet cuz you can fire off as many of these as you want. Very helpful for shell scripts.


    2
    ( trap '' 1; ( nice -n 19 sleep 2h && command rm -v -rf /garbage/ &>/dev/null && trap 1 ) & )
    AskApache · 2009-10-10 04:43:44 1

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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

copy/mkdir and automatically create parent directories
The --parents option will cause cp or mkdir to automatically create the parent directory structure. $mkdir --parents /one/two/three/dir will create /one, /one/two, and /one/two/three as needed before creating dir. cp will copy files with their full directory structure into the target directory with this option. Thanks to Peter Leung at: http://linuxcommando.blogspot.com/2007/11/use-of-parents-flag-in-mkdir-and-c.html which has good examples of usage.

find out how much space are occuipied by files smaller than 1024K
The command gives size of all files smaller than 1024k, this information, together with disk usage, can help determin file system parameter (e.g. block size) or storage device (e.g. SSD v.s. HDD). Note if you use awk instead of "cut| dc", you easily breach maximum allowed number of records in awk.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Generic shell function for modifying files in-place
Some commands (such as sed and perl) have options to support in-place editing of files, but many commands do not. This shell function enables any command to change files in place. See the sample output for many examples. The function uses plain sh syntax and works with any POSIX shell or derivative, including zsh and bash.

Quick access to ASCII code of a key

Show errors in the kernel ring buffer
Much more useful then parsing syslog

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Rename files in batch

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.


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