Commands by joem86 (4)

  • Often times you run a command in the terminal and you don't realize it's going to take forever. You can open a new terminal, but you lose the local history of the suspended one. You can stop the running command using , but that may produce undesirable side-effects. suspends the job, and (assuming you have no other jobs running in the background) %1 resumes it. Appending & tells it to run in the background. You now have a job running concurrently with your terminal. Note this will still print any output to the same terminal you're working on. Tested on zsh and bash. Show Sample Output


    -1
    <ctrl+z> %1 &
    joem86 · 2010-10-25 17:43:38 2
  • After typing cd directory [enter] ls [enter] so many times, I figured I'd try to make it into a function. I was surprised how smoothly I was able to integrate it into my work on the command line. Just use cdls as you would cd. It will automatically list the directory contents after you cd into the directory. To make the command always available, add it to your .bashrc file. Not quite monumental, but still pretty convenient. Show Sample Output


    7
    function cdls { cd $1; ls; }
    joem86 · 2009-03-10 19:13:47 6
  • This command will generate white noise through your speakers (assuming you have sound enabled). It's good for staying focused, privacy, coping with tinnitus, etc. I use it to test that the sound works.


    4
    cat /dev/urandom > /dev/dsp
    joem86 · 2009-02-18 21:40:29 0
  • While copying a large file that may take up a good chunk of your hard drive, start the copy and run this command concurrently. It will print out the disk information every second. It's pretty handy when you have a large copy with nothing to monitor the progress.


    5
    watch -n 1 df
    joem86 · 2009-02-18 21:34:06 1

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print all characters of a file using hexdump
'od -c' works like 'hexdump -c' but is available on other operating systems that don't ship with hexdump (e.g. solaris).

Unbelievable Shell Colors, Shading, Backgrounds, Effects for Non-X
I've been using linux for almost a decade and only recently discovered that most terminals like putty, xterm, xfree86, vt100, etc., support hundreds of shades of colors, backgrounds and text/terminal effects. This simply prints out a ton of them, the output is pretty amazing. If you use non-x terminals all the time like I do, it can really be helpful to know how to tweak colors and terminal capabilities. Like: $ echo $'\33[H\33[2J'

Output Windows services in a neatly formated list (cygwin)
Outputs Windows Services service name and display name using "sc query", pipes the output to "awk" for processing, then "column" for formatting. List All Services: $ sc query state= all | awk '/SERVICE_NAME/{printf"%s:",$2;getline;gsub(/DISP.*:\ /,"");printf"%s\n",$0}' | column -ts\: List Started Services: $sc query | awk '/SERVICE_NAME/{printf"%s:",$2;getline;gsub(/DISP.*:\ /,"");printf"%s\n",$0}' | column -ts\: List Stopped Services: $sc query state= inactive| awk '/SERVICE_NAME/{printf"%s:",$2;getline;gsub(/DISP.*:\ /,"");printf"%s\n",$0}' | column -ts\:

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Router discovery

Kill any process with one command using program name
This will kill all. e.g. killall firefox

Hardlink all identical files in the current directory (regain some disk space)
Meaning of switches (see man page too): v verbose p ignore mode (permissions) o ignore owner, group t ignore time of modification Disadvantage: If you modify any linked file, this will propagate to all other files which occupy the same space.

du with colored bar graph
i'm using gawk, you may get varying mileage with other varieties. You might want to change the / after du to say, /home/ or /var or something, otherwise this command might take quite some time to complete. Sorry it's so obsfucated, I had to turn a script into a one-liner under 255 characters for commandlinefu. Note: the bar ratio is relative, so the highest ratio of the total disk, "anchors" the rest of the graph. EDIT: the math was slightly wrong, fixed it. Also, made it compliant with older versions of df.

Remove grep itself from ps
When you 'ps|grep' for a given process, it turns out that grep itself appears as a valid line since it contains the RE/name you are looking for. To avoid grep from showing itself, simply insert some wildcard into process' name.

convert vdi to vmdk (virtualbox hard disk conversion to vmware hard disk format)
Converts a .vdi file to a .vmdk file for use in a vmware virtual machine. The benefit: using this method actually works. There are others out there that claim to give you a working .vmdk by simply using the qemu-img command alone. Doing that only results in pain for you because the .vmdk file will be created with no errors, but it won't boot either. Be advised that these conversions are very disk-intensive by nature; you are probably dealing with disk images several gigabytes in size. Once finished, the process of using the new .vmdk file is left as an exercise to the reader.


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