Commands by stu (2)

  • apart from not being generalisable to all shells, `Y <<< X` seems nicer to me than `echo X | Y`, e.g. &lt;&lt;&lt; lol cat; it reads easier, you type less, and it also looks cool


    15
    base64 -d <<< aHR0cDovL3d3dy50d2l0dGVyc2hlZXAuY29tL3Jlc3VsdHMucGhwP3U9Y29tbWFuZGxpbmVmdQo=
    stu · 2009-03-27 23:20:23 5
  • this exits bash without saving the history. unlike explicitly disabling the history in some way, this works anywhere, and it works if you decide *after* issuing the command you don't want logged, that you don't want it logged ... $$ ( or ${$} ) is the pid of the current bash instance this also works perfectly in shells that don't have $$ if you do something like kill -9 `readlink /proc/self`


    29
    kill -9 $$
    stu · 2009-03-27 23:13:53 4

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