Backup files incremental with rsync to a NTFS-Partition

rsync -rtvu --modify-window=1 --progress /media/SOURCE/ /media/TARGET/
This will backup the _contents_ of /media/SOURCE to /media/TARGET where TARGET is formatted with ntfs. The --modify-window lets rsync ignore the less accurate timestamps of NTFS.

12
By: 0x2142
2009-07-05 07:40:10

These Might Interest You

  • Although not frequently used, it is possible to clone an NTFS partition to an image file and, where necessary, restore the image to another partition. This command is useful, for example, if we want to keep a backup copy of our Windows installation, or in a corporate environment to install or repair a Windows of one or more computers. For the command syntax is refer to the documentation (man ntfsclone)


    -3
    ntfsclone
    0disse0 · 2011-07-02 17:37:19 0
  • With this command you can create an empty NTFS partition. The command is useful if, for example, we want to format a previous installation of Windows and reinstall before you want to restore some files on the partition.


    -3
    mkntfs /dev/hda1
    0disse0 · 2011-07-02 17:43:16 0
  • This command securely erases all the unused blocks on a partition. The unused blocks are the "free space" on the partition. Some of these blocks will contain data from previously deleted files. You might want to use this if you are given access to an old computer and you do not know its provenance. The command could be used while booted from a LiveCD to clear freespace space on old HD. On modern Linux LiveCDs, the "ntfs-3g" system provides ReadWrite access to NTFS partitions thus enabling this method to also be used on Wind'ohs drives. NB depending on the size of the partition, this command could take a while to complete. Show Sample Output


    8
    # cd $partition; dd if=/dev/zero of=ShredUnusedBlocks bs=512M; shred -vzu ShredUnusedBlocks
    mpb · 2009-06-21 14:17:22 6
  • This command will backup the entire / directory, excluding /dev, /proc, /sys, /tmp, /run, /mnt, /media, /lost+found directories. Let us break down the above command and see what each argument does. rsync: A fast, versatile, local and remote file-copying utility -aAXv: The files are transferred in ?archive? mode, which ensures that symbolic links, devices, permissions, ownerships, modification times, ACLs, and extended attributes are preserved. -/: Source directory -exclude: Excludes the given directories from backup. -/mnt: It is the backup destination folder. Please be mindful that you must exclude the destination directory, if it exists in the local system. It will avoid the an infinite loop. To restore the backup, just reverse the source and destination paths in the above command.


    0
    rsync -aAXv / --exclude={"/dev/*","/proc/*","/sys/*","/tmp/*","/run/*","/mnt/*","/media/*","/home/*","/lost+found/*"} <backup path> > <path_of log file>
    vinabb · 2017-07-26 13:33:50 0

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Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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