Commands using eject (9)

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Update all packages installed via homebrew
As of March 7, 2012: $ brew update - downloads upgraded formulas $ brew upgrade [FORMULA...] - upgrades the specified formulas $ brew outdated - lists outdated installations Note updating all packages may take an excruciatingly long time. You might consider a discriminating approach: run `brew outdated` and select specific packages needing an upgrade. For more information see homebrew's git repository: https://github.com/mxcl/homebrew

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

check open ports without netstat or lsof

randomize hostname and mac address, force dhcp renew. (for anonymous networking)
this string of commands will release your dhcp address, change your mac address, generate a new random hostname and then get a new dhcp lease.

Automatically update all the installed python packages

Create a persistent connection to a machine
Create a persistent SSH connection to the host in the background. Combine this with settings in your ~/.ssh/config: Host host ControlPath ~/.ssh/master-%r@%h:%p ControlMaster no All the SSH connections to the machine will then go through the persisten SSH socket. This is very useful if you are using SSH to synchronize files (using rsync/sftp/cvs/svn) on a regular basis because it won't create a new socket each time to open an ssh connection.

Ring the system bell after finishing a long script/compile
This will ring the system bell once if your script exits successfully and twice if it fails. So you can go look at something else and it will alert you when done. Don't forget to use 'xset b [vol [pitch [duration]]]' to get the bell to sound the way you want.

Query well known ports list
Uses the file located in /etc/services

Summary of disk usage, excluding other filesystems, summarised and sorted by size
This command is useful for finding out which directories below the current location use the most space. It is summarised by directory and excludes mounted filesystems. Finally it is sorted by size.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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