Commands by mrttlemonde (10)

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Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

bash script to zip a folder while ignoring git files and copying it to dropbox
Better tool for exporting git's repository is Git itself!

Sort contents of a directory with human readable output
Show sizes of all files and directories in a directory in size order. $du -hs * | sort -hr for reverse order. Taken from http://serverfault.com/questions/62411/how-can-i-sort-du-h-output-by-size

show the date every rpm was installed
the newest rpms are at the top; individual packages can also be queried this way: rpm --last -q package

Rename all (jpg) files written as 3 number in 4 numbers.
Useful if you have a list of images called 1 2 3 4 and so on, you can adapt it to rewrite it as 4 (in this example) 0-padded number.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Ensure that each machine that you log in to has its own history file
On systems where your home directory is shared across different machines, your bash history will be global, rather than being a separate history per machine. This setting in your .bashrc file will ensure that each machine has its own history file.

loop over a set of items that contain spaces
If you want to operate on a set of items in Bash, and at least one of them contains spaces, the `for` loop isn't going to work the way you might expect. For example, if the current dir has two files, named "file" and "file 2", this would loop 3 times (once each for "file", "file", and "2"): $ for ITEM in `ls`; do echo "$ITEM"; done Instead, use a while loop with `read`: $ ls | while read ITEM; do echo "$ITEM"; done

make pgsql backup and gzip it

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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