Commands by ubersoldat (3)

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list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

cd to (or operate on) a file across parallel directories
This is useful for quickly jumping around branches in a file system, or operating on a parellel file. This is tested in bash. cd to (substitute in PWD, a for b) where PWD is the bash environmental variable for the "working directory"

Broadcast your shell thru ports 5000, 5001, 5002 ...
run 'nc yourip 5000', 'nc yourip 5001' or 'nc yourip 5002' elsewhere will produce an exact same mirror of your shell. This is handy when you want to show someone else some amazing stuff in your shell without giving them control over it.

show the working directories of running processes
this shows the CWD of every running `java' command. YMMV but we often switch to a working directory for each service to start and run from there -- therefore this quicly shows what is running by a more meaningful name than command alone (the -bw prevents using blocking system calls which speeds this up quite a bit in the presence of remote mounted filesystems)

Print the IPv4 address of a given interface

Command Line to Get the Stock Quote via Yahoo
Retrieve the current stock price from Yahoo Finance. The output is simply the latest price (which could be delayed). If you want to look up stock for a different company, replace csco with your symbol.

Application network trace based on application name
This command takes an application name as an argument and then it will listen to the tcp traffic and capture packets matching the process Id of the application. The output shows: local address / local port / Remote Address / Remote port / State / Owning Process ID

Vectorize xkcd strips
Uses ImageMagick and potrace to vectorize the input image, with parameters optimized for xkcd-like pictures.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Find ulimit values of currently running process
When dealing with system resource limits like max number of processes and open files per user, it can be hard to tell exactly what's happening. The /etc/security/limits.conf file defines the ceiling for the values, but not what they currently are, while $ ulimit -a will show you the current values for your shell, and you can set them for new logins in /etc/profile and/or ~/.bashrc with a command like: $ ulimit -S -n 100000 >/dev/null 2>&1 But with the variability in when those files get read (login vs any shell startup, interactive vs non-interactive) it can be difficult to know for sure what values apply to processes that are currently running, like database or app servers. Just find the PID via "ps aux | grep programname", then look at that PID's "limits" file in /proc. Then you'll know for sure what actually applies to that process.


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