Commands by glaudiston (49)

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Shows physically connected drives (SCSI or SATA)
This will show all physically connected SATA (and SCSI) drives on your system. This is particularly useful when troubleshooting hard disks.... or when a mount point seems to be missing.

Exclude inserting a table from a sql import
Starting with a large MySQL dump file (*.sql) remove any lines that have inserts for the specified table. Sometimes one or two tables are very large and uneeded, eg. log tables. To exclude multiple tables you can get fancy with sed, or just run the command again on subsequently generated files.

Go to the Nth line of file [text editor]
This is not printing, real editing using the text editor.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Have a random "cow" say a random thing
You need to have fortune and cowsay installed. It uses a subshell to list cow files in you cow directory (this folder is default for debian based systems, others might use another folder). you can add it to your .bashrc file to have it great you with something interesting every time you start a new session.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Instantly load bash history of one shell into another running shell
By default bash history of a shell is appended (appended on Ubuntu by default: Look for 'shopt -s histappend' in ~/.bashrc) to history file only after that shell exits. Although after having written to the history file, other running shells do *not* inherit that history - only newly launched shells do. This pair of commands alleviate that.

View Processeses like a fu, fu
I don't truly enjoy many commands more than this one, which I alias to be ps1.. Cool to be able to see the heirarchy and makes it clearer what need to be killed, and whats really going on.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Get your current Public IP


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