Commands by IT2008 (0)

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Find removed files still in use via /proc
Oracle DBA remove some logfiles which are still open by the database and he is complaining the space has not been reclaimed? Use the above command to find out what PID needs to be stopped. Or alternatively recover the file via: $ cp /proc/pid/fd/filehandle /new/file.txt

Find if $b is in $a in bash
Find if $b is in $a in bash

Find the package that installed a command

Upgrading packages. Pacman can update all packages on the system with just one command. This could take quite a while depending on how up-to-date the system is. This command can synchronize the repository databases and update the system's packages.
Warning: Instead of immediately updating as soon as updates are available, users must recognize that due to the nature of Arch's rolling release approach, an update may have unforeseen consequences. This means that it is not wise to update if, for example, one is about to deliver an important presentation. Rather, update during free time and be prepared to deal with any problems that may arise. Pacman is a powerful package management tool, but it does not attempt to handle all corner cases. Read The Arch Way if this causes confusion. Users must be vigilant and take responsibility for maintaining their own system. When performing a system update, it is essential that users read all information output by pacman and use common sense. If a user-modified configuration file needs to be upgraded for a new version of a package, a .pacnew file will be created to avoid overwriting settings modified by the user. Pacman will prompt the user to merge them. These files require manual intervention from the user and it is good practice to handle them right after every package upgrade or removal. See Pacnew and Pacsave Files for more info. Tip: Remember that pacman's output is logged in /var/log/pacman.log.

Extract a bash function
I often need to extract a function from a bash script and this command will do it.

Sorts and compare 2 files line by line

Find the package a command belongs to on debian-based distros
Advanced revision to the command 8776 . This revision follows symbolic links. The quotation-marks surrounding $(which $1) allows for graceful handling of errors ( ie. readlink does not complain incase 'which' command generates (null) output)

ssh -A [email protected]
the -A argument forwards your ssh private keys to the host you're going to. Useful in some scenarios where you have to hop to one server, and then login to another using a private key.

makes screen your default shell without breaking SCP or SFTP
I changed my shell to screen by editing .bashrc, this stopped scp from connecting. Adding two tests before screen fixed them problem.

Create a single-use TCP (or UDP) proxy
Redirect the local port 2000 to the remote port 3000. The same but UDP: $ nc -u -l -p 2000 -c "nc -u example.org 3000" It may be used to "convert" TCP client to UDP server (or viceversa): $ nc -l -p 2000 -c "nc -u example.org 3000"


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