Commands by UNiXKiD (0)

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Kill all processes that listen to ports begin with 50 (50, 50x, 50xxx,...)
Run netstat as root (via sudo) to get the ID of the process listening on the desired socket. Use awk to 1) match the entry that is the listening socket, 2) matching the exact port (bounded by leading colon and end of column), 3) remove the trailing slash and process name from the last column, and finally 4) use the system(…) command to call kill to terminate the process. Two direct commands, netstat & awk, and one forked call to kill. This does kill the specific port instead of any port that starts with 50. I consider this to be safer.

Count to 65535 in binary (for no apparent reason)
Yes, it's useless.

Determine next available UID
better with accounts on ldap

Non Numeric Check
use to execute a block of code only if $var is numeric

Route outbound SMTP connections through a addtional IP address rather than your primary

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Backup a file with a date-time stamp
Appends the input file with the date format YYYY-MM-DD.bak. Also runs silently if you remove the -v on the cp at the end of the function.

Calculate N!

move a lot of files over ssh
Useful to move many files (thousands or millions files) over ssh. Faster than scp because this way you save a lot of tcp connection establishments (syn/ack packets). If using a fast lan (I have just tested gigabyte ethernet) it is faster to not compress the data so the command would be: tar -cf - /home/user/test | ssh user@sshServer 'cd /tmp; tar xf -'

Using bash inline
There are two ways to use "here documents" with bash to fill stdin: The following example shows use with the "bc" command. a) Using a delimiter at the end of data: $ less-than less-than eeooff bc > k=1024 > m=k*k > g=k*m > g > eeooff 1073741824 b) using the "inline" verion with three less-than symbols: $ less-than less-than less-than "k=1024; m=k*k; g=k*m; g" bc 1073741824 One nice advantage of using the triple less-than version is that the command can easily be recalled from command line history and re-executed. PS: in this "description", I had to use the name "less-than" to represent the less-than symbol because the commandlinefu input text box seems to eat up the real less-than symbols. Odd.


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