Commands by anonjoe (0)

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Using numsum to sum a column of numbers.
numsum is part of of the num-utils package, which is available in some Linux distros and can also be downloaded at http://suso.suso.org/xulu/Num-utils. It contains about 10 different programs for dealing with numbers from the command line. Obviously you can do a lot of things that the num-utils programs do in awk, sed, bash, perl scripts, but num-utils are there so that you don't have to remember the syntax for more complex operations and can just think: compute the sum, average, boundary numbers, etc.

mean color of an image
You can get the mean value for the colours in an image. Then you can determine, in general, how dark or bright is the image and run some other actions based on that. I'll recommend to readjust the brightness of the images using +sigmoidal-contrast option of imagemagick convert command.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Remove color codes (special characters) with sed

Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs (inspired from the work of the user justsomeguy)
Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale.

Unix commandline history substitution like ^foo^bar BUT for multiple replacements
#1 You invoked a command chain. #2 You globaly replace the scriptnames and execute them direct #3 The new executed command chain [# ^foo^bar] would only replace the firts match [foo] with [bar].

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Prettify an XML file
Generated XML files often are poorly formatted. Use this command to properly indent and normalize the file in-place.

Change the homepage of Firefox
This command modifies the preferences file of Firefox that is located in .mozilla/firefox/*.default/prefs.js. It edits the file with sed and the -i option. Then it searches the string "browser.startup.homepage", and the string next to it (second string). Finally, it replaces the second string with the new homepage, that is http://sliceoflinux.com in the example. It doesn't work if you haven't set any homepage.

Show the 20 most CPU/Memory hungry processes
This command will show the 20 processes using the most CPU time (hungriest at the bottom). You can see the 20 most memory intensive processes (hungriest at the bottom) by running: $ ps aux | sort +3n | tail -20 Or, run both: $ echo "CPU:" && ps aux | sort +2n | tail -20 && echo "Memory:" && ps aux | sort +3n | tail -20


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