Commands by ceesaxp (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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run command on a group of nodes in parallel

Download all images from a 4chan thread
first grep all href images then sed the url part then wget

Fork Bomb for Windows
Quick and dirty forkbomb for all flavors of windows Do not use in production. Replace start with a command of your choice, this will just open a new command prompt and is pretty tricky to stop once started

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

truncate deleted files from lsof
While the posted solution works, I'm a bit uneasy about the "%d" part. This would be hyper-correct approach: $ lsof|gawk '$4~/txt/{next};/REG.*\(deleted\)$/{sub(/.$/,"",$4);printf ">/proc/%s/fd/%s\n", $2,$4}' Oh, and you gotta pipe the result to sh if you want it to actually trim the files. ;) Btw, this approach also removes false negatives (OP's command skips any deleted files with "txt" in their name).

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Multiplication table
The multiplication table for math study

Find file containing namespace in a directory of jar files.
You could subsitute javax.servlet for any namespace you need.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.


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