Commands by jillianmontague (0)

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Append last argument to last command
Just like "!$", except it does it instantly. Then you can hit enter if you want.

The program listening on port 8080 through IPv6

Print a list of standard error codes and descriptions.
Written by jmcnamara Taken from http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=274896

Rename all images in current directory to filename based on year, month, day and time based on exif information

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Show top 50 running processes ordered by highest memory/cpu usage refreshing every 1s
http://alvinalexander.com/linux/unix-linux-process-memory-sort-ps-command-cpu for an overview of --sort available values

clean up memory of unnecessary things (Kernerl 2.6.16 or newer)
run sync first to flush useful things out to disk!!! To free pagecache: echo 1 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches To free dentries and inodes: echo 2 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches To free pagecache, dentries and inodes: echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches

Pronounce an English word using Merriam-Webster.com
Looks up a word on merriam-webster.com, does a screen scrape for the FIRST audio pronunciation and plays it. USAGE: Put this one-liner into a shell script (e.g., ~/bin/pronounce) and run it from the command line giving it the word to say: $ pronounce lek If the word isn't found in merriam-webster, no audio is played and the script returns an error value. However, M-W is a fairly complete dictionary (better than howjsay.com which won't let you hear how to pronounce naughty words). ASSUMPTIONS: GNU's sed (which supports -r for extended regular expressions) and Linux's aplay. Aplay can be replaced by any program that can play .WAV files from stdin. KNOWN BUGS: only the FIRST pronunciation is played, which is problematic if you wanted a particular form (plural, adjectival, etc) of the word. For example, if you run this: $ pronounce onomatopoetic you'll hear a voice saying "onomatopoeia". Playing the correct form of the word is possible, but doing so might make the screen scraper even more fragile than it already is. (The slightest change to the format of m-w.com could break it).

Join lines split with backslash at the end
Joins each line that end with backslash (common way to mark line continuation in many languages) with the following one while removing the backslash.

Easily decode unix-time (funtion)
A shell function using perl to easily convert Unix-time to text. Put in in your ~/.bashrc or equivalent. Tested on Linux / Solaris Bourne, bash and zsh. using perl 5.6 and higher. (Does not require GNU date like some other commands)


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