Commands by judieseth (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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Remind yourself to leave in 15 minutes
If you spend most of your time in front of the terminal, leave is a useful reminder. Leave can have absolute form: leave 1555 reminds you to leave at 3:55PM

search for text in files. recursive.
recursively search dir for a a particular file type, search each file for a particular text.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

identify exported sonames in a path
This provides a list of shared object names (sonames) that are exported by a given tree. This is usually useful to make sure that a given required dependency (NEEDED entry) is present in a firmware image tree. The shorter (usable) version for it would be $ scanelf -RBSq -F "+S#f" But I used the verbose parameters in the command above, for explanation.

Create a .png from a command output and upload to ompdlr.org, give URI
Create a .png from output command or whatever, the upload and give URI from ompdlr.org

Blue Matrix
Same as original, but works in bash

Generate a Random MAC address
Use the following variation for FreeBSD: $ openssl rand 6 | xxd -p | sed 's/\(..\)/\1:/g; s/:$//'

Poor man's nmap for a class C network from rfc1918
What do you do when nmap is not available and you want to see the hosts responding to an icmp echo request ? This one-liner will print all hosts responding with their ipv4 address.

Search for a string in all files recursively

Colorized grep in less
Get your colorized grep output in less(1). This involves two things: forcing grep to output colors even though it's not going to a terminal and telling less to handle those properly.


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